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Part V - Cognitive and Motivational Perspectives: Dynamic Processes of Personality

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2020

Philip J. Corr
Affiliation:
City, University London
Gerald Matthews
Affiliation:
University of Central Florida
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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