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Child and adolescent depression

from Part IX - Developmental pathology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2017

Brian Hopkins
Affiliation:
Lancaster University
Elena Geangu
Affiliation:
Lancaster University
Sally Linkenauger
Affiliation:
Lancaster University
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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References

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