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Weed-Free Yield Response of Seven Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Cultivars to CGA-362622 Postemergence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Dunk Porterfield
Affiliation:
Crop Science Department, P.O. Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
John W. Wilcut
Affiliation:
Crop Science Department, P.O. Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Scott B. Clewis
Affiliation:
Crop Science Department, P.O. Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Keith L. Edmisten
Affiliation:
Crop Science Department, P.O. Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Field studies were conducted in 1998 and 1999 to evaluate the response of seven cotton cultivars to CGA-362622 applied postemergence at 7.5 and 15 g ai/ha to three- to five-leaf cotton. The cultivars evaluated included Deltapine 51, Deltapine NuCotn 33B, Paymaster 1220 RR, Paymaster 1220 BG/RR, Stoneville bromoxynil-resistant 47, Stoneville 474, and Sure-Grow 125. At 1 to 2 wk after treatment (WAT), CGA-362622 at 7.5 and 15 g/ha injured all cotton cultivars 7 to 9% and 13 to 15%, respectively. Cotton injury symptoms included chlorosis and minor stunting. At 3 to 4 WAT, injury from CGA-362622 at 7.5 and 15 g/ha was 2 to 6% and 7 to 9%, respectively. Except for Paymaster 1220 RR, Deltapine NuCotn 33B, and Stoneville 474, all cotton cultivars were injured more by the higher rate than by the lower rate of CGA-362622. Injury was not visibly apparent 6 to 8 WAT. CGA-362622 at either rate had no effect on cotton lint yield.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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Weed-Free Yield Response of Seven Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Cultivars to CGA-362622 Postemergence
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