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Relative Safety of Preemergence Corn Herbicides Applied to Coarse-Textured Soil

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 June 2017

Kurt M. Vollmer
Affiliation:
Postdoctoral Researcher, Professor, Research Associate, and Research Associate, University of Delaware Carvel Research and Education Center, Georgetown, DE 19947
Mark J. VanGessel
Affiliation:
Postdoctoral Researcher, Professor, Research Associate, and Research Associate, University of Delaware Carvel Research and Education Center, Georgetown, DE 19947
Quintin R. Johnson
Affiliation:
Postdoctoral Researcher, Professor, Research Associate, and Research Associate, University of Delaware Carvel Research and Education Center, Georgetown, DE 19947
Barbara A. Scott
Affiliation:
Postdoctoral Researcher, Professor, Research Associate, and Research Associate, University of Delaware Carvel Research and Education Center, Georgetown, DE 19947
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Crop safety is an important consideration in determining PRE herbicide application, especially when multiple herbicide sites-of-action are used. This research examined relative corn injury as the result of PRE applications containing ALS- and/or HPPD-inhibiting herbicides to a sandy loam soil. Herbicide premixes containing clopyralid, flumetsulam, isoxaflutole, mesotrione, rimsulfuron, tembotrione, thifensulfuron, and thiencarbazone were applied at twice the labeled rate. In general, isoxaflutole alone was the safest herbicide evaluated, while PRE applications of rimsulfuron-containing herbicides caused the most corn stunting, had a lower recovery rate, and lower yields. However, POST applications of mesotrione plus rimsulfuron stunted corn less than 2%. Although there was little correlation between corn injury and yield, growers should be aware of the other factors, such as soil texture and environment that may impact crop production.

Type
Weed Management-Major Crops
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2017 

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Footnotes

Associate Editor for this paper: Kevin Bradley, University of Missouri.

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