Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-hb754 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-03-04T05:15:04.463Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Nitrogen fertilizer programs following rice exposure to a sub-lethal concentration of paraquat

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2020

Benjamin H. Lawrence*
Affiliation:
Assistant Extension/Research Professor, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, Delta Research and Extension Center, Stoneville, MS, USA
Jason A. Bond
Affiliation:
Research/Extension Professor, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, Delta Research and Extension Center, Stoneville, MS, USA
Bobby R. Golden
Affiliation:
Extension/Research Professor, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, Delta Research and Extension Center, Stoneville, MS, USA
Thomas W. Allen
Affiliation:
Associate Extension/Research Professor, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, Delta Research and Extension Center, Stoneville, MS, USA
Daniel B. Reynolds
Affiliation:
Professor and Endowed Chair, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State University, Dorman Hall, Mississippi State, MS
Taghi Bararpour
Affiliation:
Assistant Extension/Research Professor, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, Delta Research and Extension Center, Stoneville, MS, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Ben Lawrence, Mississippi State University, Delta Research and Extension Center, P.O. Box 197, Stoneville, MS38776. Email: bhl21@msstate.edu

Abstract

Off-target paraquat movement to rice has become a major problem in recent years for rice producers in the midsouthern United States. Nitrogen (N) fertilizer is applied to rice in greater quantity and frequency than all other nutrients to optimize rice yield. Two separate field studies were conducted from 2015 to 2018 in Stoneville, MS, to assess whether starter N fertilizer can aid rice recovery from exposure to a sub-lethal concentration of paraquat and to evaluate rice response to different N fertilizer management strategies following exposure to a sub-lethal concentration of paraquat. In both studies, paraquat treatments consisted of paraquat at 0 and 84 g ai ha–1 applied to rice in the two- to three-leaf (EPOST) growth stage. In the starter fertilizer study, N fertilizer at 24 kg ha–1 as ammonium sulfate (AMS) was applied to rice at spiking- to one-leaf (VEPOST), two- to three-leaf (EPOST), or three- to four-leaf (MPOST) growth stages before and after paraquat treatment. In the N fertilizer timing study, N fertilizer at 168 kg N ha–1 was applied in a single four-leaf to one-tiller (LPOST) application or two-, three-, and two four-way split applications. Despite starter N fertilizer applications, paraquat injured rice ≥41%, reduced height 57%, reduced dry weight prior to flooding 77%, delayed maturity 10 d, reduced dry weight at maturity 33%, and reduced rough rice yield 35% in the starter fertilizer study. Similarly, in the N fertilizer timing study, paraquat injured rice ≥45%, reduced height 14%, delayed maturity 10 d, reduced dry weight at maturity 44%, and reduced rough rice yield 50% for all N fertilizer management strategies. Both studies indicate that severe complications in growth and development can occur from rice exposure to a sub-lethal concentration of paraquat. In both studies, manipulation of N fertilizer management did not facilitate rice recovery from early-season exposure to paraquat.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

Associate Editor: Eric Webster, Louisiana State University AgCenter

References

Adair, CR, Bollich, CN, Bowman, DH, Jordon, NE, Johnson, TH, Webb, BD, Atkins, JG (1972) Rice breeding and testing methods in the United States. Pages 25–75 in Rice in the United States: Varieties and Production. USDA Agricultural Research Service Handbook 289. Washington, DC: US Department of AgricultureGoogle Scholar
Al-Khatib, K, Peterson, DE (1999) Soybean (Glycine max) response to simulated drift from selected sulfonylurea herbicides, dicamba, glyphosate, and glufosinate. Weed Technol 7:97102 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anonymous (2018) Burndown weed management. Pages 19–23 in Bond JA, Lawrence BH, Bararpour TM, Dodds DM, Golden BR, Irby JT, Larson EJ, Reynolds DB, eds, 2019 Weed Management Suggestions for Mississippi Row Crops. Mississippi State Univ Ext Ser and Miss Agric and For Exp Stn, Publ 3171. Mississippi State, MS: Mississippi State UniversityGoogle Scholar
Anonymous (2019) Gramoxone SL herbicide label. http://www.cdms.net/ldat/ldAGR000.pdf. Accessed: May 4, 2019Google Scholar
Bednarz, CW, Harris, GH, Shurley, WD (2000) Agronomic and economic analyses of cotton starter fertilizers. Agron J 92:766771 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blouin, DC, Webster, EP, Bond, JA (2011) On the analysis of combined experiments. Weed Technol 25:165169 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bollich, PK, Lindau, CW, Norman, RJ (1994) Management of fertilizer nitrogen in dry-seeded, delayed-flood rice. Aust J Exp Agric 34:10071012 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bond, JA, Bollich, PK (2007) Yield and quality response of rice cultivars to preflood and late-season nitrogen. Crop Manag 2007:6370, 10.1094/CM-2007-0122-03-RS Google Scholar
Bond, JA, Griffin, JL, Ellis, JM, Linscombe, SD, Williams, BJ (2006) Corn and rice response to simulated drift of imazethapyr plus imazapyr. Weed Technol 20:113117 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buehring, N (2008) Rice growth and development. Pages 35 in Miller, T, Street, J, Buehring, N, Kanter, D, Walker, T, Bond, J, Silva, M, Pringle, L, Thomas, J, Damicone, J, Moore, B, Fox, J, Sciumbato, Robbins J, Martin, S, eds, Mississippi Rice Growers Guide. Mississippi State Univ Ext Ser Pub 2255. Starkville, MS: Mississippi State University Google Scholar
Buehring, N, Walker, T, Bond, J (2008) Rice stand establishment. Pages 1016 in Miller, T, Street, J, Buehring, N, Kanter, D, Walker, T, Bond, J, Silva, M, Pringle, L, Thomas, J, Damicone, J, Moore, B, Fox, J, Sciumbato, Robbins J, Martin, S, eds, Mississippi Rice Growers Guide. Mississippi State Univ Ext Ser Pub 2255. Starkville, MS: Mississippi State University Google Scholar
Bufogle, A Jr, Bollich, PK, Kovar, JL, Lindau, CW, Macchivelli, RE (1997) Rice plant growth and nitrogen accumulation from a midseason application. J Plant Nutr 20:11911201 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Culpepper, SA, Webster, TM, Sosnoskie, LM, York, AL (2010) Glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth in the United States. Page 207 in Nandula, VK, ed, Glyphosate Resistance in Crops and other Weeds: History, Development, and Management. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Inc Google Scholar
Davis, B, Scott, RC, Norsworthy, JK, Gbur, E (2011) Response of rice (Oryza sativa) to low rates of glyphosate and glufosinate. Weed Technol 25:198203 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dillon, KA, Walker, TW, Harrell, DL, Krutz, LJ, Varco, CH, Cox, MS (2012) Nitrogen sources and timing effects on nitrogen loss in delayed flood rice. Agron J 104:466472 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edwards, CB (2013) Postemergence and residual control of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) with dicamba. Master’s thesis. Starkville, MS: Mississippi State University. 30 pGoogle Scholar
Ellis, JM, Griffin, JL, Linscombe, SD, Webster, EP (2003) Rice (Oryza sativa) and corn (Zea mays) response to simulated drift of glyphosate and glufosinate. Weed Technol 17:452460 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gordon, WB, Whitney, DA, Fijell, DL (1998) Starter fertilizer interactions with corn and grain sorghum hybrids. Better Crops 82:1619 Google Scholar
Griggs, BR, Norman, RJ, Wilson, CE Jr, Slaton, NA (2007) Ammonia volatilization and nitrogen uptake for conventional and conservation tilled dry-seeded, delayed flood rice. Soil Sci Soc Am J 71:745751 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harrell, D, Saichuk, J (2014a) General agronomic guidelines. Pages 317 in Saichuk, J ed, Louisiana Rice Production Handbook. Louisiana State Univ Div Agriculture Ext Publ 2321. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Google Scholar
Harrell, D, Saichuk, J (2014b) Soils, plant nutrition, and fertilization. Pages 2430 in Saichuk, J ed. Louisiana Rice Production Handbook. Louisiana State Univ Div Agriculture Ext Publ 2321. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Google Scholar
Heap, IM (2019) International survey of herbicide resistant weeds. http://www.weedscience.org/Home.aspx. Accessed: April 29, 2019Google Scholar
Hensley, JB, Webster, EP, Blouin, DC, Harrell, DL, Bond, JA (2012) Impact of drift rates of imazethapyr and low carrier volume on non-Clearfield rice. Weed Technol 26:236242 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kurtz, ME, Street, JE (2003) Response of rice (Oryza sativa) to glyphosate applied to simulate drift. Weed Technol 17:234238 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lawrence, BH, Bond, JA, Golden, BR, Edwards, HM, Peeples, JD, McCoy, J (2018) Effect of a sub-lethal rate of paraquat applied to rice at different growth stages. Pages 242–243 in Proceedings of the Southern Weed Science Society 71st Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA. https://www.swss.ws/wp-content/uploads/2018-SWSS-proceedings-FINAL.pdf. Accessed: April 23, 2019Google Scholar
Lawrence, BH, Bond, JA, Golden, BR, Allen, TW Jr., Reynolds, DB, Bararpour, T (2020) Rice (Oryza sativa) performance following exposure to a sub-lethal concentration of paraquat applied alone or in mixture with common residual herbicides. Weed Technol, 10.1017/wet.2020.39 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Norman, RJ, Guindo, D, Wells, BR, Wilson, CE Jr (1992) Seasonal accumulation and partitioning of nitrogen-15 in rice. Soil Sci Soc Am J 56:15211527 Google Scholar
Norman, RJ, Wilson, CE Jr, Slaton, NA (2003) Soil fertilization and mineral nutrition in U.S. mechanized rice culture. Pages 331401 in Smith, CW, Dilday, RH, eds., Rice Origin, History, Technology, and Production. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons Inc Google Scholar
Norman, RJ, Wilson, CE Jr, Slaton, NA, Griggs, BR, Bushong, JT, Gbur, EE (2009) Nitrogen fertilizer sources and timing before flooding dry-seeded, delayed-flood rice. Soil Sci Soc Am J 73:21842190 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Norman, RJ, Slaton, NA, Roberts, TL (2013) Soil fertility. Pages 69102 in Hardke, TJ, ed, Rice Production Handbook. University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture Cooperative Extension Service MP192. Fayetteville, AR: University of ArkansasGoogle Scholar
Osborne, SL, Riedell, WE (2006) Starter nitrogen fertilizer impact on soybean yield and quality in the northern Great Plains. Agron J 98:15691574 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Owen, MDK (2000) Current use of transgenic herbicide-resistant soybean and corn in the USA. Crop Prot 19:765771 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rogers, CW, Norman, RJ, Brye, KR, Smartt, AD, Hardke, JT, Roberts, TL, Slaton, NA, Dempsey Fulford, AM, Frizzell, DL (2013) Rice grain yield as influenced by nitrogen source, rate, and application time. Pages 317–323 in Norman RJ, Moldenhauer KAK, eds, B.R. Wells Arkansas Rice Research Studies 2013. Ark Agr Exp Sta Res Ser Pub 617. Fayetteville, AR: University of ArkansasGoogle Scholar
Saxton, AM (1998) A macro for converting mean separation output into letter grouping in ProcMixed. Pages 1243–1246 in Proceedings of the 23rd SAS users Group International. Cary, NC: SAS InstituteGoogle Scholar
Shaner, DL, ed (2014) Herbicide Handbook. 10th edn. Lawrence, KS: Weed Science Society of America. Pp 337338 Google Scholar
Street, JE, Bollich, RK (2003) Rice production. Pages 271296 in Smith, CW, Dilday, RH eds, Rice Origin, History, Technology, and Production. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons Inc Google Scholar
[USDA-NASS] United States Department of Agriculture National Agriculture Statistics Service (2019) Statistics by Subject. http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_Subject. Accessed: October 22, 2019Google Scholar
Walker, TW, Bond, JA, Ottis, BV, Harrell, DL (2008a) The effects of starter nitrogen to rice seeded at various densities. Crop Manag, 10.1094/CM-2008-0911-01-RS CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Walker, TW, Bond, JA, Ottis, BV, Gerard, PD, Harrell, DL (2008b) Hybrid rice response to nitrogen fertilization for midsouthern Untied States rice production. Crop Manag, 10.2134/agronj2007.0047 Google Scholar
Ward, SM, Webster, TM, Steckel, LE (2013) Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri): a review. Weed Technol 27:1227 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Webster, EP, Hensley, JB, Blouin, DC, Harrell, DL, Bond, JA (2015) Impact of off-site deposition of glufosinate to non-Clearfield rice. Weed Technol 29:207216 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Webster, EP, Hensley, JB, Blouin, DC, Harrell, DL, Bond, JA (2016) Rice crop response to simulated drift of imazamox. Weed Technol 30:99105 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Webster, TM (2013) Weed Survey—southern states: broadleaf crops subsection (cotton, peanut, soybean, tobacco, and forestry). Proc South Weed Sci Soc 66:275287 Google Scholar
Wilson, CE Jr, Bollich, PK, Norman, RJ (1998) Nitrogen application timing effects on nitrogen efficiency of dry-seeded rice. Soil Sci Soc Am J 62:959964 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wilson, CE Jr, Norman, RJ, Wells, BR (1989) Seasonal uptake patterns of fertilizer nitrogen applied in split applications to rice. Soc Sci Soc Am J 53:18841887 CrossRefGoogle Scholar