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New Technological Developments to Reduce Groundwater Contamination by Herbicides

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Edward E. Schweizer
Affiliation:
Agric. Res. Ser., U. S. Dep. Agric. Crops Res. Lab., Colo. State Univ., Fort Collins, CO 80523

Abstract

Strategies to prevent chemical contamination of groundwater will be more effective and cost less than cleaning up groundwater. Advances in weed control technologies have improved timing of herbicide applications, have reduced application rates from kg/ha to g/ha, and have distributed herbicides better within the weed-crop complex. These technologies include microbial pesticides, controlled-release formulations, herbicide chemistry, improved integrated weed management systems, and bioeconomic weed-crop models that reduce herbicide use. These new technologies should reduce the quantity of herbicides used by farmers and lessen the chances of groundwater contamination.

Type
Symposium
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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