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Impact of reduced rates of 2,4-D and glyphosate on sweetpotato growth and yield

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 June 2020

Thomas M. Batts
Affiliation:
Former Graduate Research Assistant, Louisiana State University AgCenter, St. Joseph, LA, USA
Donnie K. Miller*
Affiliation:
Professor and John B. Baker Professor for Excellence in Weed Science, Louisiana State University AgCenter, St. Joseph, LA, USA
James L. Griffin
Affiliation:
Professor Emeritus, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, USA
Arthur O. Villordon
Affiliation:
Professor, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Chase, LA, USA
Daniel O. Stephenson IV
Affiliation:
Professor, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Alexandria, LA, USA
Kathrine M. Jennings
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, Department of Horticultural Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA
Sushila Chaudhari
Affiliation:
Assistant Professor, Department of Horticulture, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
David C. Blouin
Affiliation:
Professor, Louisiana State University Department of Experimental Statistics, Baton Rouge, LA, USA
Josh T. Copes
Affiliation:
Assistant Professor, Louisiana State University AgCenter, St. Joseph, LA, USA
Tara P. Smith
Affiliation:
Professor, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Alexandria, LA, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Donnie K. Miller, Louisiana State University AgCenter Northeast Research Station, PO Box 438, St. Joseph, LA, 71366. (Email: dmiller@agcenter.lsu.edu)

Abstract

Commercialization of 2,4-D–tolerant crops is a major concern for sweetpotato producers because of potential 2,4-D drift that can cause severe crop injury and yield reduction. A field study was initiated in 2014 and repeated in 2015 to assess impacts of reduced rates of 2,4-D, glyphosate, or a combination of 2,4-D with glyphosate on sweetpotato. In one study, 2,4-D and glyphosate were applied alone and in combination at 1/10, 1/100, 1/250, 1/500, 1/750, and 1/1,000 of anticipated field use rates (1.05 kg ha−1 for 2,4-D and 1.12 kg ha−1 for glyphosate) to ‘Beauregard’ sweetpotato at storage root formation (10 days after transplanting [DAP]). In a separate study, all these treatments were applied to ‘Beauregard’ sweetpotato at storage root development (30 DAP). Injury with 2,4-D alone or in combination with glyphosate was generally equal or greater than with glyphosate applied alone at equivalent herbicide rates, indicating that injury is attributable mostly to 2,4-D in the combination. There was a quadratic increase in crop injury and quadratic decrease in crop yield (with respect to most yield grades) with increased rate of 2,4-D applied alone or in combination with glyphosate applied at storage root development. However, neither the results of this relationship nor of the significance of herbicide rate were observed on crop injury or sweetpotato yield when herbicide application occurred at storage root formation, with a few exceptions. In general, crop injury and yield reduction were greatest at the highest rate (1/10×) of 2,4-D applied alone or in combination with glyphosate, although injury observed at lower rates was also a concern after initial observation by sweetpotato producers. However, in some cases, yield reduction of U.S. no.1 and marketable grades was also observed after application of 1/250×, 1/100×, or 1/10× rates of 2,4-D alone or with glyphosate when applied at storage root development.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2020

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Footnotes

Associate Editor: Steve Fennimore, University of California, Davis

References

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