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Imazaquin Absorption, Translocation, and Metabolism in Flue-Cured Tobacco

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Frank R. Walls Jr.
Affiliation:
Crop Sci. Dep., N.C. State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Frederick T. Corbin
Affiliation:
Crop Sci. Dep., N.C. State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
William K. Collins
Affiliation:
Crop Sci. Dep., N.C. State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
A. Douglas Worsham
Affiliation:
Crop Sci. Dep., N.C. State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
J. R. Bradley Jr.
Affiliation:
Entomol. Dep., N.C. State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7620

Abstract

Absorption of 14C-imazaquin by leaves of field-grown flue-cured tobacco was similar when applied to young seedlings immediately after transplanting or to plants 3 wk after transplanting. The distribution of 14C in treated leaves indicated that 40% was absorbed, 54% remained in water extracts of leaf surfaces, and 6% was found in the epicuticular wax layer 8 d after treatment. Translocation of the herbicide from treated leaves to roots was very low (4 to 5%). In contrast, soil applications of imazaquin and subsequent uptake by roots resulted in retention of 40 to 53% in roots and translocation of 47 to 60% to shoots after 8 d. Analyses of methanol-soluble extracts of 14C indicated that more than 77% of the foliar-applied herbicide was metabolized in roots and upper shoots after 2 d. Similarly, 64% or more of the imazaquin was degraded in roots and shoots 2 d after root absorption.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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