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Herbicide Programs Utilizing Halauxifen-Methyl for Glyphosate-Resistant Horseweed (Conyza canadensis) Control in Soybean

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 October 2018

Marcelo Zimmer*
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA
Bryan G. Young
Affiliation:
Professor, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA
William G. Johnson
Affiliation:
Professor, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Marcelo Zimmer, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, 915 West State Street, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 47907. (Email: zimmer6@purdue.edu)

Abstract

Evolution of glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds, such as horseweed, presents major challenges in no-till soybean production systems. Effective GR horseweed control with preplant burndown applications is necessary to prevent potential soybean yield losses due to competition and to manage the soil weed seedbank. Halauxifen-methyl is a new synthetic auxin herbicide for broadleaf weed control in preplant burndown applications for soybean and other crops at low use rates (5 g ae ha–1). Experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of herbicide treatments containing halauxifen-methyl for control of GR horseweed in comparison to existing herbicide treatments utilized in no-till GR soybean systems. Glyphosate alone controlled horseweed 33%. Herbicide treatments that included halauxifen-methyl, dicamba, or saflufenacil in combination with glyphosate controlled horseweed 87% to 96%, 89%, and 93%, respectively, 35 d after burndown application (DAB). Horseweed control, horseweed density reduction, and ground cover reduction by halauxifen-methyl plus glyphosate was similar to dicamba plus glyphosate. Horseweed control was greater for halauxifen-methyl plus glyphosate than for 2,4-D plus glyphosate. Cloransulam, cloransulam plus flumioxazin, and cloransulam plus sulfentrazone added to halauxifen-methyl plus glyphosate increased horseweed control and reduced horseweed density. No herbicide injury or soybean yield reduction was observed for treatments containing halauxifen-methyl.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2018. 

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Herbicide Programs Utilizing Halauxifen-Methyl for Glyphosate-Resistant Horseweed (Conyza canadensis) Control in Soybean
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