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A Grower Survey of Herbicide Use Patterns in Glyphosate-Resistant Cropping Systems

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Wade A. Givens*
Affiliation:
Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762
David R. Shaw
Affiliation:
Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762
William G. Johnson
Affiliation:
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907
Stephen C. Weller
Affiliation:
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907
Bryan G. Young
Affiliation:
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901
Robert G. Wilson
Affiliation:
University of Nebraska, Scottsbluff, NE 69361
Micheal D. K. Owen
Affiliation:
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011
David Jordan
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: wgivens@gri.msstate.edu.

Abstract

A telephone survey was conducted with growers in Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Nebraska, Mississippi, and North Carolina to discern the utilization of the glyphosate-resistant (GR) trait in crop rotations, weed pressure, tillage practices, herbicide use, and perception of GR weeds. This paper focuses on survey results regarding herbicide decisions made during the 2005 cropping season. Less than 20% of the respondents made fall herbicide applications. The most frequently used herbicides for fall applications were 2,4-D and glyphosate, and these herbicides were also the most frequently used for preplant burndown weed control in the spring. Atrazine and acetochlor were frequently used in rotations containing GR corn. As expected, crop rotations using a GR crop had a high percentage of respondents that made one to three POST applications of glyphosate per year. GR corn, GR cotton, and non-GR crops had the highest percentage of growers applying non-glyphosate herbicides during the 2005 growing season. A crop rotation containing GR soybean had the greatest negative impact on non-glyphosate use. Overall, glyphosate use has continued to increase, with concomitant decreases in utilization of other herbicides.

Type
Education/Extension
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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