Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-kw98b Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-02-20T16:43:13.667Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Evaluation of Mesotrione in Mississippi Delta Corn Production

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Daniel O. Stephenson IV*
Affiliation:
Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, 115 Plant Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701
Jason A. Bond
Affiliation:
Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, 115 Plant Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701
Eric R. Walker
Affiliation:
Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, 115 Plant Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701
Mohammad T. Bararpour
Affiliation:
Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, 115 Plant Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701
Lawrence R. Oliver
Affiliation:
Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, 115 Plant Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: dosteph@ufl.edu

Abstract

Field studies were conducted in Arkansas in 1999, 2000, and 2001 to evaluate mesotrione applied preemergence (PRE) and postemergence (POST) for weed control in corn grown in the Mississippi Delta region of the United States. Mesotrione was applied PRE (140, 210, and 280 g/ha) alone and POST (70, 105, and 140 g/ha), alone or in tank mixtures with atrazine (280 g/ha). Standard treatments for comparison were S-metolachlor/atrazine PRE and S-metolachlor plus atrazine PRE followed by atrazine POST. All PRE treatments controlled velvetleaf, pitted morningglory, entireleaf morningglory, prickly sida, and broadleaf signalgrass 95% 2 wk after emergence (WAE). Mesotrione controlled velvetleaf 89% or more 4 and 6 WAE. Control of morningglory species by mesotrione POST averaged 92% 6 WAE. Prickly sida was controlled at least 90% by all treatments 4 WAE. Mesotrione applied alone PRE and POST controlled broadleaf signalgrass 83 to 91% 4 WAE. All treatments controlled broadleaf signalgrass less than 90% 6 WAE, except treatments that contained S-metolachlor, which gave 94% or greater control. Corn yield ranged from 10.5 to 12.4 Mg/ha and did not differ among treatments. Mesotrione PRE and POST provided excellent control of broadleaf weeds, but S-metolachlor was needed for broadleaf signalgrass control.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Literature Cited

Anonymous. 2003a. Crop Production and Agricultural Chemical Usage in Field Crops. Agricultural Statistics Board, NASS, and USDA: Web page: http://www.usda.gov/nass. Accessed: August 12, 2003.Google Scholar
Anonymous. 2003b. Crops County and District Data. Agricultural Statistics Board, NASS and USDA: Web page: http://www.usda.gov/nass. Accessed: August 12, 2003.Google Scholar
Armel, G. R., Wilson, H. P., Richardson, R. J., and Hines, T. E. 2003a. Mesotrione combinations for postemergence control of horsenettle (Solanum carolinense) in corn (Zea mays). Weed Technol. 17:6572.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armel, G. R., Wilson, H. P., Richardson, R. J., and Hines, T. E. 2003b. Mesotrione combinations in no-till corn (Zea mays). Weed Technol. 17:111116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armel, G. R., Wilson, H. P., Richardson, R. J., and Hines, T. E. 2003c. Mesotrione, acetochlor, and atrazine for weed management in corn (Zea mays). Weed Technol. 17:284290.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Breeden, G. K., Rhodes, G. N. Jr., and Mueller, T. C. 2001. Utility of mesotrione in southern corn weed management systems. Proc. South. Weed Sci. Soc 54:1415.Google Scholar
Buhler, D. D. 1991. Early preplant atrazine and metolachlor in conservation tillage corn (Zea mays L). Weed Technol. 5:6671.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cahoon, J., Ferguson, J., Edwards, D., and Tucker, P. 1990. A microcomputer-based irrigation scheduler for the humid mid-south region. Appl. Eng. Agric 6:289295.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carmer, S. G., Nyquist, W. E., and Walker, W. M. 1989. Least significant differences for combined analysis of experiments with two- or three-factor treatment designs. Agron. J 81:655672.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heap, I., DiNicola, N., and Glasgow, L. 2003. Herbicide Resistant Weeds of the USA: Web page: http://www.weedscience.org/in.asp. Accessed: August 14, 2003.Google Scholar
Johnson, B. C. and Young, B. G. 2002. Influence of temperature and relative humidity on the foliar activity of mesotrione. Weed Sci. 50:157161.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, C. J., Young, B. G., and Matthews, J. L. 2002. Effect of postemergence application rate and timing of mesotrione on corn (Zea mays) response and weed control. Weed Technol. 16:414420.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mitchell, G., Bartlett, D. W., Fraser, T. E., Hawkes, T. R., Holt, D. C., Townson, J. K., and Wichert, R. A. 2001. Mesotrione: a new selective herbicide for use in maize. Pest Manag. Sci 57:120128.3.0.CO;2-E>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mueller, T. C. and Hayes, R. M. 1997. Effect of tillage and soil-applied herbicides on broadleaf signalgrass (Brachiaria platyphylla) control in corn (Zea mays). Weed Technol. 11:698703.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mueller, T. C. and Hayes, R. M. 2002. Interference of broadleaf signalgrass in corn and control with new chemistries. Proc. South. Weed. Sci. Soc 55:135.Google Scholar
Norris, S. R., Shen, X., and DellaPenna, D. 1998. Complementation of the arabidopsis pds1 mutant with the gene encoding p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase. Plant Physiol 117:13171323.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ohmes, G. A., Kendig, J. A., Barham, R. L., and Ezell, P. M. 2000. Efficacy of ZA1296 in corn. Proc. South. Weed Sci. Soc 53:225.Google Scholar
[SAS] Statistical Analysis Systems. 2000. SAS/STAT User's Guide. Release 8.1. Cary, NC: Statistical Analysis Systems Institute.Google Scholar
Simmons, F. W., Parker, D. C., and Wax, L. M. 2000. Mesotrione efficacy response to rainfall and soil water. Proc. N. Cent. Weed. Sci. Soc 55:103.Google Scholar
Sutton, P., Richards, C., Buren, L., and Glasgow, L. 2002. Activity of mesotrione on resistant weeds in maize. Pest Manag. Sci 58:981984.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed