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Cover Crop Management and Weed Control in Corn (Zea mays)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Gregg A. Johnson
Affiliation:
Dep. Agron., Univ. Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211
Michael S. Defelice
Affiliation:
Dep. Agron., Univ. Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211
Zane R. Helsel
Affiliation:
Dep. Agron., Univ. Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211

Abstract

Field experiments were conducted in central Missouri in 1989 and 1990 to evaluate weed control practices in conjunction with cover crops and cover management systems in reduced tillage corn. There was no difference in weed control among soybean stubble, hairy vetch, and rye soil cover when averaged over cover management systems and herbicide treatments. However, mowed hairy vetch and rye covers provided greater weed control in the no-till plots than soybean stubble when no herbicide was used. Differences in weed control among cover management systems were reduced or eliminated when a PRE herbicide was applied. corn population and height were reduced by hairy vetch and rye soil cover. Corn grain yield was reduced in rye plots both years. There was no difference in grain yield between tilled and no-till plots.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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