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Processing facial emotions in adults with velo-cardio-facial syndrome: functional magnetic resonance imaging

  • Therese Van Amelsvoort (a1), Nicole Schmitz (a2), Eileen Daly (a3), Quinton Deeley (a3), Hugo Critchley (a4), Jayne Henry (a3), Dene Robertson (a3), Michael Owen (a5), Kieran C. Murphy (a6) and Declan G. Murphy (a3)...

Summary

We studied the functional neuroanatomy of social behaviour in velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) using a facial emotional processing task and functional magnetic resonance imaging in adults with this syndrome and controls matched for age and IQ. The VCFS group had less activation in the right insula and frontal brain regions and more activation in occipital regions. Genetically determined abnormalities in pathways including those involved in emotional processing may underlie deficits in social cognition in people with VCFS.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Therese van Amelsvoort, Department of Psychiatry Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Email: t.a.vanamelsvoort@amc.uva.nl

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Declaration of interest

None. The study was part funded by the Stanley Foundation and the Medical Research Council.

Footnotes

References

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Critchley, H., Daly, E., Phillips, M., et al (2000) Explicit and implicit neural mechanisms for processing of social information from facial expressions: afunctional magnetic resonance imaging study. Human Brain Mapping, 9, 93105.
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Henry, J., van Amelsvoort, T., Morris, R., et al (2002) An investigation of the neuropsychological profile in adults with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS). Neuropsychologia, 40, 471478.
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Van Amelsvoort, T., Daly, E., Henry, J., et al (2004) Brain anatomy in adults with velo-cardio-facial syndrome with and without schizophrenia: preliminary results of a structural magnetic resonance imaging study. Archives of General Psychiatry, 61, 10851096.

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Processing facial emotions in adults with velo-cardio-facial syndrome: functional magnetic resonance imaging

  • Therese Van Amelsvoort (a1), Nicole Schmitz (a2), Eileen Daly (a3), Quinton Deeley (a3), Hugo Critchley (a4), Jayne Henry (a3), Dene Robertson (a3), Michael Owen (a5), Kieran C. Murphy (a6) and Declan G. Murphy (a3)...
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