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Neuroinflammatory and morphological changes in late-life depression: the NIMROD study

  • Li Su (a1), Yetunde O. Faluyi (a1), Young T. Hong (a2), Tim D. Fryer (a2), Elijah Mak (a1), Silvy Gabel (a3), Lawrence Hayes (a1), Soteris Soteriades (a1), Guy B. Williams (a2), Robert Arnold (a1), Luca Passamonti (a4), Patricia Vázquez Rodríguez (a4), Ajenthan Surendranathan (a1), Richard W. Bevan-Jones (a1), Jonathan Coles (a5), Franklin Aigbirhio (a2), James B. Rowe (a6) and John T. O'Brien (a1)...

Summary

We studied neuroinflammation in individuals with late-life, depression, as a risk factor for dementia, using [11C]PK11195 positron emission tomography (PET). Five older participants with major depression and 13 controls underwent PET and multimodal 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with blood taken to measure C-reactive protein (CRP). We found significantly higher CRP levels in those with late-life depression and raised [11C]PK11195 binding compared with controls in brain regions associated with depression, including subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, and significant hippocampal subfield atrophy in cornu ammonis 1 and subiculum. Our findings suggest neuroinflammation requires further investigation in late-life depression, both as a possible aetiological factor and a potential therapeutic target.

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Copyright

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence.

Corresponding author

Li Su, Department of Psychiatry, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Box 189, Level E4, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge, CB2 0SP, UK. Email: ls514@cam.ac.uk

Footnotes

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These authors are joint senior authors.

Declaration of interest

J.T.O.'B. consulted for GE Healthcare, Servier and Bayer Healthcare and has received honoraria for talks from Pfizer, GE Healthcare, Eisai, Shire, Lundbeck, Lilly and Novartis.

Footnotes

References

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Neuroinflammatory and morphological changes in late-life depression: the NIMROD study

  • Li Su (a1), Yetunde O. Faluyi (a1), Young T. Hong (a2), Tim D. Fryer (a2), Elijah Mak (a1), Silvy Gabel (a3), Lawrence Hayes (a1), Soteris Soteriades (a1), Guy B. Williams (a2), Robert Arnold (a1), Luca Passamonti (a4), Patricia Vázquez Rodríguez (a4), Ajenthan Surendranathan (a1), Richard W. Bevan-Jones (a1), Jonathan Coles (a5), Franklin Aigbirhio (a2), James B. Rowe (a6) and John T. O'Brien (a1)...

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Neuroinflammatory and morphological changes in late-life depression: the NIMROD study

  • Li Su (a1), Yetunde O. Faluyi (a1), Young T. Hong (a2), Tim D. Fryer (a2), Elijah Mak (a1), Silvy Gabel (a3), Lawrence Hayes (a1), Soteris Soteriades (a1), Guy B. Williams (a2), Robert Arnold (a1), Luca Passamonti (a4), Patricia Vázquez Rodríguez (a4), Ajenthan Surendranathan (a1), Richard W. Bevan-Jones (a1), Jonathan Coles (a5), Franklin Aigbirhio (a2), James B. Rowe (a6) and John T. O'Brien (a1)...
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