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Moving beyond categories and dimensions in personality pathology assessment and diagnosis

  • Steven K. Huprich (a1)

Abstract

It has been suggested that a dimensional model of personality pathology should be adopted for the development and refinement of personality disorder classification. In this article, the advantages and challenges of moving toward a dimensional model are briefly reviewed. However, it is suggested that although categories and dimensions are valuable frameworks for personality pathology diagnosis, an expansion beyond categories and dimensions is needed to improve the shortcoming seen in current diagnostic systems. Ideas and examples are offered for how this might occur.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Steven K. Huprich, University of Detroit Mercy, 4001 West McNichols Road, Detroit, MI 48221, USA. Email: hupricst@udmercy.edu

References

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Moving beyond categories and dimensions in personality pathology assessment and diagnosis

  • Steven K. Huprich (a1)

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Moving beyond categories and dimensions in personality pathology assessment and diagnosis

  • Steven K. Huprich (a1)
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