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Forensic psychiatry and public protection

  • Alec Buchanan (a1) and Adrian Grounds (a2)

Summary

The prominence of risk in UK social and criminal justice policy creates opportunities, challenges and dangers for forensic psychiatry. The future standing of the specialty will depend not only on the practical utility of its responses to those opportunities and challenges, but also the ethical integrity of those responses.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Alec Buchanan, PhD, MD, FRCPsych, Associate Professor, Law and Psychiatry, Yale University Department of Psychiatry, 34 Park Street, New Haven, CT 06519, USA. Email: alec.buchanan@yale.edu

Footnotes

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See reappraisal, pp. 431–433, this issue.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Forensic psychiatry and public protection

  • Alec Buchanan (a1) and Adrian Grounds (a2)

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Forensic psychiatry and public protection

  • Alec Buchanan (a1) and Adrian Grounds (a2)
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