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Distinguishing characteristics of subjects with good and poor early outcome in the Edinburgh High-Risk Study

  • Eve C. Johnstone (a1), Richard Cosway (a1) and Stephen M. Lawrie (a1)

Abstract

Background

High-risk’ studies of schizophrenia have the potential to clarify the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Here, results of extreme outcome groups in the Edinburgh High-Risk Study are presented.

Aims

To compare groups of good and poor outcome from the Edinburgh High-Risk Study and clarify the nature of the change from the state of vulnerability to that of developing psychosis.

Method

The recruitment procedure is described. Good and poor outcome are defined. These groups are compared in terms of genetic liability and of baseline and change in neuropsychology and neuroanatomy.

Results

Demographic characteristics and genetic liability do not differ between the groups. The good outcome group perform better at baseline in some neuropsychological tests, but there is little neuroanatomical difference. The poor outcome group show consistently impaired memory function and a tendency to reduction in temporal lobe size.

Conclusions

In genetically predisposed subjects, the change from vulnerability to developing psychosis may be marked by a reduced size and impaired function of the temporal lobe.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Eve Johnstone, University Department of Psychiatry, Kennedy Tower, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, Morningside Park, Edinburgh EH10 5HF, UK

Footnotes

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Presented in part at the European First Episode Schizophrenia Network Meeting, Whistler BC, Canada, 27 April 2001.

Declaration of interest

This study was financed by the Medical Research Council, which supports S.M.L. and R.C.

Footnotes

References

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Distinguishing characteristics of subjects with good and poor early outcome in the Edinburgh High-Risk Study

  • Eve C. Johnstone (a1), Richard Cosway (a1) and Stephen M. Lawrie (a1)

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Distinguishing characteristics of subjects with good and poor early outcome in the Edinburgh High-Risk Study

  • Eve C. Johnstone (a1), Richard Cosway (a1) and Stephen M. Lawrie (a1)
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