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Day-to-day associations between subjective sleep and affect in regard to future depressionin a female population-based sample

  • Jessica A. de Wild-Hartmann (a1), Marieke Wichers (a2), Alex L. van Bemmel (a1), Catherine Derom (a3), Evert Thiery (a4), Nele Jacobs (a5), Jim van Os (a6) and Claudia J. P. Simons (a1)...

Abstract

Background

Poor sleep is a risk factor for depression, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms.

Aims

Disentangling potential mechanisms by which sleep may be related to depression by zooming downto the ‘micro-level’ of within-person daily life patterns of subjective sleep and affect usingthe experience sampling method (ESM).

Method

A population-based twin sample consisting of 553 women underwent a 5-day baseline ESM protocolassessing subjective sleep and affect together with four follow-up assessments of depression.

Results

Sleep was associated with affect during the next day, especially positive affect. Daytime negative affect was not associated with subsequent night-time sleep. Baseline sleep predicted depressive symptoms across the follow-up period.

Conclusions

The subtle, repetitive impact of sleep on affect on a daily basis, rather than the subtle repetitive impact of affect on sleep, may be one of the factors on the pathway to depression in women.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Jessica A. de Wild-Hartmann, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. Email: j.dewild-hartmann@maastrichtuniversity.nl

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

J.v.O. is or has been an unrestricted research grant holder with, or has received financial compensation as an independent symposium speaker from, Eli Lilly, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Lundbeck, Organon, Janssen-Cilag, GlaxoSmithKline, AstraZeneca, Pfizer and Servier.

Footnotes

References

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Day-to-day associations between subjective sleep and affect in regard to future depressionin a female population-based sample

  • Jessica A. de Wild-Hartmann (a1), Marieke Wichers (a2), Alex L. van Bemmel (a1), Catherine Derom (a3), Evert Thiery (a4), Nele Jacobs (a5), Jim van Os (a6) and Claudia J. P. Simons (a1)...
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