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Computer-aided self-help for phobia/panic via internet at home: A pilot study

  • Mark Kenwright (a1), Isaac M. Marks (a1), Lina Gega (a1) and David Mataix-Cols (a1)

Summary

In an open study, ten people with phobia or panic disorder who could not travel repeatedly to a therapist accessed a computer-aided exposure self-help system (Fear Fighter) at home on the internet with brief therapist support by telephone. They improved significantly, and their outcome and satisfaction resembled those in patients with similar disorders who used Fear Fighter in clinics with brief face-to-face therapist support.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Mark Kenwright, Ealing Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Service, Avenue House, 43–47 Avenue Road, Acton, London W3 8NJ, UK. Tel: +44(0)771 248 3045

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

I.M.M. has intellectual property rights in Fear Fighter.

Footnotes

References

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Bebbington, P. E., Brugha, T. S., Meitzer, H., et al (2000) Neurotic disorders and the receipt of psychiatric treatment. Psychological Medicine, 30, 13691376.
Beck, A. T., Epstein, N., Brown, G., et al (1988) An inventory for measuring clinical anxiety: psychometric properties. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 56, 893897.
Department of Health (2001) Treatment Choice in Psychological Therapies and Counselling: Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guideline. London: Stationery Office.
Kenwright, M., Liness, S. & Marks, I. M. (2001) Reducing demands on clinicians by offering computer-aided self-help for phobia/panic: feasibility study. British Journal of Psychiatry, 179, 456459.
Marks, I. M. & Mathews, A. M. (1979) Brief standard self-rating for phobic patients. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 23, 563569.
Marks, I. M., Mataix-Cols, D., Kenwright, M., et al (2003) Pragmatic evaluation of computer-aided self-help for anxiety and depression. British Journal of Psychiatry, 183, 5765.
Marks, I. M., Kenwright, M., McDonough, M., et al (2004) Saving clinicians time by delegating routine aspects of therapy to a computer: a randomized controlled trial in phobia/panic disorder. Psychological Medicine, 34, 917.
Mundt, J. C., Marks, I. M., Shear, M. K., et al (2002) The Work and Social Adjustment Scale: a simple measure of impairment in functioning. British Journal of Psychiatry, 180, 461464.
World Health Organization (1992) International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD–10). Geneva: WHO.
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Computer-aided self-help for phobia/panic via internet at home: A pilot study

  • Mark Kenwright (a1), Isaac M. Marks (a1), Lina Gega (a1) and David Mataix-Cols (a1)
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