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Adjunctive fast repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in depression

  • Ian M. Anderson (a1), Nicola A. Delvai (a1), Bettadapura Ashim (a2), Sindhu Ashim (a3), Cherry Lewin (a4), Vineet Singh (a4), Daniel Sturman (a4) and Paul L. Strickland (a4)...

Summary

The place of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of depression remains unclear. In this sham-controlled study we determined the efficacy and acceptability of fast, left frontal rTMS given three times a week over 4–6 weeks to 29 patients with depression (79% treatment-resistant). The procedure was generally well tolerated and more effective than sham treatment (55 v. 7% responding, P<0.05), with improvement maintained to 12 weeks. This therapy could be a useful addition to available treatments but further research is needed to determine the optimum treatment parameters.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Ian Anderson, Neuroscience and Psychiatry Unit, Room G907, Stopford Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, UK. Tel: +44 (0) 161 275 7428; fax: +44 (0) 161 275 7429; email: ian.anderson@manchester.ac.uk

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Declaration of interest

None.

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References

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Adjunctive fast repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in depression

  • Ian M. Anderson (a1), Nicola A. Delvai (a1), Bettadapura Ashim (a2), Sindhu Ashim (a3), Cherry Lewin (a4), Vineet Singh (a4), Daniel Sturman (a4) and Paul L. Strickland (a4)...

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Adjunctive fast repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in depression

  • Ian M. Anderson (a1), Nicola A. Delvai (a1), Bettadapura Ashim (a2), Sindhu Ashim (a3), Cherry Lewin (a4), Vineet Singh (a4), Daniel Sturman (a4) and Paul L. Strickland (a4)...
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