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Addressing alcohol-related dementia should involve better detection, not watchful waiting

  • Rahul (Tony) Rao (a1) and Brian Draper (a2)

Summary

Alcohol-related dementia represents an underrecognised mental disorder with both clinical and public mental health aspects. There is considerable scope for improving its assessment within both mainstream and specialist mental health services, but ongoing challenges remain in ensuring its timely detection so that appropriate preventative and rehabilitative interventions can be applied.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Rahul Rao, Southwark Community Team for Older People, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Marina House, 63–65 Denmark Hill, London SE5 8RS, UK. Email: tony.rao@slam.nhs.uk

References

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Addressing alcohol-related dementia should involve better detection, not watchful waiting

  • Rahul (Tony) Rao (a1) and Brian Draper (a2)
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