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A workplace farmstand pilot programme in Omaha, Nebraska, USA

  • Farryl MW Bertmann (a1), Hollyanne E Fricke (a2), Leah R Carpenter (a2), Daniel J Schober (a2), Teresa M Smith (a2), Courtney A Pinard (a2) and Amy L Yaroch (a2)...

Abstract

Objective

To explore the feasibility of a workplace farmstand programme through the utilization of an online ordering system to build awareness for local food systems, encourage community participation, and increase local fruit and vegetable availability.

Design

A 4-week pilot to explore feasibility of workplace farmstand programmes through a variety of outcome measures, including survey, mode of sale, weekly sales totals and intercept interviews.

Setting

A large private company in Sarpy County, Omaha, Nebraska, USA.

Subjects

Employees of the company hosting the farmstand programme.

Results

Pre-programme, a majority of employees indicated that quality (95·4 %), variety (94·6 %) and cost of fruits and vegetables (86·4 %) were driving factors in their fruit and vegetable selection when shopping. The availability of locally or regionally produced fruits and vegetables was highly important (78·1 %). Participants varied in their definition of local food, with nearly half (49·2 %) reporting within 80·5 km (50 miles), followed by 160·9 km (100 miles; 29·5 %) and 321·9 km (200 miles; 12·1 %). Weekly farmstand purchases (both walk-ups and online orders) ranged from twenty-eight to thirty-nine employees, with weekly sales ranging from $US 257·95 to 436·90 for the producer. The mode of purchase changed throughout the pilot, with higher use of online ordering in the beginning and higher use of walk-up purchasing at the end.

Conclusions

The workplace farmstand pilot study revealed initial interest by both employees and a producer in this type of programme, helped to establish a sustained producer–employer relationship and led to additional opportunities for both the producer and employer.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email hfricke@centerfornutrition.org

References

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Keywords

A workplace farmstand pilot programme in Omaha, Nebraska, USA

  • Farryl MW Bertmann (a1), Hollyanne E Fricke (a2), Leah R Carpenter (a2), Daniel J Schober (a2), Teresa M Smith (a2), Courtney A Pinard (a2) and Amy L Yaroch (a2)...

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