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Validity and reliability of an FFQ for use with adolescents in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • Tang K Hong (a1), Michael J Dibley (a2) and David Sibbritt (a3)

Abstract

Objective

The present study evaluates the reliability and validity of an FFQ designed for use with adolescents in urban Vietnam.

Design

A cohort study was conducted between December 2003 and June 2004. The FFQ was administered three times over a 6-month period (FFQ 1–3) and nutrient intakes were compared to those obtained from four 24 h recalls collected over the same period (24 h recalls 1–4) using crude, energy-adjusted and de-attenuated correlation coefficients. The level of agreement between the two measurements was also evaluated with Bland–Altman analysis. The percentage of nutrient intakes classified within one quintile, as well as quadratic-weighted kappa statistics, were calculated.

Setting

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Subjects

A total of 180 students were recruited in three junior high schools.

Results

Coefficients ranged from 0·22 for retinol to 0·78 for fibre for short-term reliability, and from 0·30 for retinol to 0·81 for zinc for long-term reliability. Coefficients for nutrient intakes between the mean of the three FFQ and mean of four 24 h recalls were mostly around 0·40, but higher for energy-adjusted nutrients. After allowing for within-person variation, the mean coefficient was 0·52 for macronutrients and 0·46 for micronutrients. There were a relatively high proportion of nutrient intakes classified within one quintile and a small number grossly misclassified. Kappa values shows ‘fair’ to ‘good’ agreement for all food/nutrient categories, while the Bland–Altman plots indicated that the FFQ is accurate in assessing nutrient intake at a group level.

Conclusions

This newly developed FFQ is a valid tool for measuring nutrient intake in adolescents in urban Vietnam.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email hongutc@yahoo.com

References

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Keywords

Validity and reliability of an FFQ for use with adolescents in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • Tang K Hong (a1), Michael J Dibley (a2) and David Sibbritt (a3)

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