Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Systematic review of the design, implementation and effectiveness of mass media and nutrition education interventions for infant and young child feeding

  • Matthew M Graziose (a1), Shauna M Downs (a2), Quentin O’Brien (a3) and Jessica Fanzo (a4)

Abstract

Objective

To systematically review the design, implementation and effectiveness of mass media and nutrition education interventions for improving infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices and related psychosocial factors.

Design

A search of PubMed, Embase and PsycINFO databases, a Google search, and a consultation with experts in the field of IYCF performed in July 2016.

Setting

Low- and middle-income countries, as defined by the World Bank Group.

Subjects

Eligible studies: included a mass media component (with or without nutrition education); conducted a pre–post evaluation (with or without a control group); assessed IYCF knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and/or practices; and were published in English between 2000 and present.

Results

Eighteen unique studies were identified that examined the effect of mass media (types included: television; print; voice and/or SMS (text) messages; radio; megaphones/loudspeakers; videos; social media; songs/dramas) and nutrition education interventions on IYCF practices within thirteen countries. Of these, fifteen studies reported improvements in breast- and/or complementary feeding practices, using indicators recommended by the WHO, and six studies reported improvements in related psychosocial factors. However, little detail was provided on the use of formative research, a formal behaviour change theory and behaviour change techniques. Few studies reported both dose delivered and participants’ exposure to the intervention.

Conclusions

Despite evidence of effectiveness, few common elements in the design of interventions were identified. Future research should consistently report these details to open the ‘black box’ of IYCF interventions, identify effective design components and ensure replicability.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Systematic review of the design, implementation and effectiveness of mass media and nutrition education interventions for infant and young child feeding
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Systematic review of the design, implementation and effectiveness of mass media and nutrition education interventions for infant and young child feeding
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Systematic review of the design, implementation and effectiveness of mass media and nutrition education interventions for infant and young child feeding
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email mmg2198@tc.columbia.edu

References

Hide All
1. UNICEF, World Health Organization & The World Bank Group (2015) Joint child malnutrition estimates – levels and trends (2015 edition). http://www.who.int/nutgrowthdb/estimates2014/en/ (accessed July 2016).
2. Black, RE, Victora, CG, Walker, SP et al. (2013) Maternal and child undernutrition and overweight in low-income and middle-income countries. Lancet 382, 427451.
3. Victora, CG, Adair, L, Fall, C et al. (2008) Maternal and child undernutrition: consequences for adult health and human capital. Lancet 371, 340357.
4. World Health Organization (2015) Essential Nutrition Actions: Improving Maternal, Newborn, Infant and Child Health and Nutrition. Geneva: WHO.
5. Balogun, OO, Dagvadorj, A, Anigo, KM et al. (2015) Factors influencing breastfeeding exclusivity during the first 6 months of life in developing countries: a quantitative and qualitative systematic review. Matern Child Nutr 11, 433451.
6. Bhutta, ZA, Das, JK, Rizvi, A et al. (2013) Evidence-based interventions for improvement of maternal and child nutrition: what can be done and at what cost? Lancet 382, 452477.
7. Shi, L & Zhang, J (2011) Recent evidence of the effectiveness of educational interventions for improving complementary feeding practices in developing countries. J Trop Pediatr 57, 9198.
8. Dewey, KG & Adu-Afarwuah, S (2008) Systematic review of the efficacy and effectiveness of complementary feeding interventions in developing countries. Matern Child Nutr 4, 2485.
9. Fabrizio, CS, Van Liere, M & Pelto, G (2015) Identifying determinants of effective complementary feeding behavior change interventions in developing countries. Matern Child Nutr 10, 575592.
10. Contento, IR (2013) Nutrition Education: Linking Theory, Research and Practice. Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett.
11. Pelto, GH, Matin, SL, Van Liere, M et al. (2015) The scope and practice of behavior change communication to improve infant and young child feeding in low- and middle-income countries: results of a practitioner study in international development organizations. Matern Child Nutr 12, 229244.
12. Baranowski, T, Cerin, E & Baranowski, J (2009) Steps in the design, development and formative evaluation of obesity prevention-related behavior change trials. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 6, 6.
13. Bartholomew, LK, Parcel, GS & Kok, G. (1998) Intervention mapping: a process for developing theory- and evidence-based health education programs. Health Educ Behav 25, 545563.
14. Davidoff, F, Dixon-Woods, M, Leviton, L et al. (2015) Demystifying theory and its use in improvement. BMJ Qual Saf 24, 228238.
15. Fanzo, JC, Graziose, MM, Kraemer, K et al. (2015) Educating and training a workforce for nutrition in a post-2015 world. Adv Nutr 6, 639647.
16. Manoff, RK (1973) Potential uses of mass media in nutrition programs. J Nutr Educ 5, 125129.
17. Naugle, DA & Hornick, RC (2014) Systematic review of the effectiveness of mass media interventions for child survival in low- and middle-income countries. J Health Commun 19, 190215.
18. Annan, K & Dryden, S (2015) Food and the transformation of Africa: getting smallholders connected. Foreign Affairs, November/December 2015 issue. https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/africa/2015-10-16/food-and-transformation-africa (accessed October 2017).
19. Aranda-Jan, CB, Mohutsiwa-Dibe, N & Loukanova, S (2014) Systematic review on what works, what does not work and why of implementation of mobile health (mHealth) projects in Africa. BMC Public Health 14, 188.
20. Hall, CS, Fottrell, E, Wilkison, S et al. (2014) Assessing the impact of mHealth interventions in low- and middle-income countries what has been shown to work. Glob Health Action 7, 25606.
21. Snyder, LB (2007) Health communication campaigns and their impact on behavior. J Nutr Educ Behav 39, 2 Suppl., S32S40.
22. Higgs, ES, Goldberg, AB, Labrique, AB et al. (2014) Understanding the role of mHealth and other media interventions for behavior change to enhance child survival and development in low- and middle-income countries: an evidence review. J Health Commun 19, 164189.
23. Lee, SH, Nurmatov, UB, Nwaru, BI et al. (2016) Effectiveness of mHealth interventions for maternal, newborn and child health in low- and middle-income countries: systematic review and meta-analysis. J Glob Health 6, 010401.
24. Wakefield, MA, Loken, B & Hornick, RC (2010) Use of mass media campaigns to change health behavior. Lancet 376, 12611271.
25. Moher, D, Liberati, A, Tetzlaff, J et al. (2009) Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses: the PRISMA Statement. Ann Intern Med 151, 264269.
26. The World Bank Group (2016) How we classify countries. http://databank.worldbank.org/data/download/site-content/CLASS.xls (accessed July 2016).
27. Armijo-Olivo, S, Stiles, CR, Hagen, NA et al. (2010) Assessment of study quality for systematic reviews: a comparison of the Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool and the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool: methodological research. J Eval Clin Pract 18, 1218.
28. White, S, Schmidt, W, Sahanggamu, D et al. (2016) Can gossip change nutrition behavior? Results of a mass media and community-based intervention trial in East Java, Indonesia. Trop Med Int Health 21, 348364.
29. Flax, VL, Negerie, M, Ibrahim, AU et al. (2014) Integrating group counseling, cell phone messaging, and participant-generated songs and dramas into a microcredit program increases Nigerian women’s adherence to international breastfeeding recommendations. J Nutr 144, 11201124.
30. Monterrosa, EC, Frongillo, EA, de Cossio, TG et al. (2013) Scripted messages delivered by nurses and radio changed beliefs, attitudes, intentions, and behaviors regarding infant and young child feeding in Mexico. J Nutr 143, 915922.
31. Bonvecchio, A, Pelto, GH, Escalante, E et al. (2007) Maternal knowledge and use of a micronutrient supplement was improved with a programmatically feasible intervention in Mexico. J Nutr 137, 440446.
32. Mashreky, SR, Rahman, F, Rahman, A et al. (2015) Role of mass media in increasing knowledge and practices of mothers on IYCF: findings from a community trial in rural Bangladesh. South East Asia J Public Health 5, 1824.
33. Sun, J, Dai, Y, Zhang, S et al. (2011) Implementation of a programme to market a complementary food supplement (Ying Yang Bao) and impacts on anaemia and feeding practices in Shanxi, China. Matern Child Nutr 7, 96111.
34. Nguyen, PH, Menon, P, Keithly, SC et al. (2014) Program impact pathway analysis of a social franchise model shows potential to improve infant and young child feeding practices in Vietnam. J Nutr 144, 16271636.
35. Jiang, H, Li, M, Wen, LM et al. (2014) Effect of short message service on infant feeding practice findings from a community-based study in Shanghai, China. JAMA Pediatr 168, 471478.
36. Sarrassat, S, Meda, N, Ouedraogo, M et al. (2015) Behavior change after 20 months of a radio campaign addressing key lifesaving family behaviors for child survival: midline results from a cluster randomized trial in rural Burkina Faso. Glob Health Sci Pract 3, 557576.
37. Crookston, BT, Dearden, KA, Chan, K et al. (2007) Buddhist nuns on the move: an innovative approach to improving breastfeeding practices in Cambodia. Matern Child Nutr 3, 1024.
38. Baker, EJ, Sanei, LC & Franklin, N (2006) Early initiation of and exclusive breastfeeding in large-scale community based programmes in Bolivia and Madagascar. J Health Popul Nutr 24, 530539.
39. Findley, SE, Uwemedimo, OT, Doctor, HV et al. (2013) Comparison of high- versus low-intensity community health worker intervention to promote newborn and child health in northern Nigeria. Intl J Womens Health 5, 717728.
40. Khayyati, F & Mansouri, M (2009) The effect of training movies on exclusive breastfeeding. Pak J Med Sci 25, 434438.
41. Kim, YM, Haq, Z, Soomro, J et al. (2015) Case study: effects of a media campaign on breastfeeding behaviours in Sindh Province, Pakistan. World Health Popul 16, 3945.
42. Seksaria, SA & Sheth, MK (2014) Mass media campaign to improve infant and young child feeding practices amongst tribal mothers of Chikhli taluka, Gujarat. Am Int J Res Human Art Soc Sci 6, 191195.
43. Nguyen, TT, Alayón, S, Nguyen, PH et al. (2016) Large-scale television campaign associated with higher prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding in Vietnam. FASEB J 30, 274.8.
44. Zhou, H, Sun, S, Luo, R et al. (2016) Impact of text message reminders on caregivers’ adherence to a home fortification program against child anemia in rural western China: a cluster-randomized controlled trial. Am J Public Health 106, 12561262.
45. Sellen, D, Mbugua, S, Webb, GA et al. (2014) Cell phone based peer counseling can support exclusive breastfeeding: a randomized controlled trial in Kenya. FASEB J 28, 119.5.
46. World Health Organization, UNICEF, US Agency for International Development, et al. (2010) Indicators for Assessing Infant and Young Child Feeding Practices. Part I: Definitions. Geneva: WHO.
47. Gillespie, AH (1981) Applying communication theory in nutrition education research. J Nutr Educ 13, issue 1, S29S33.
48. Institute of Medicine (2002) Speaking of Health: Assessing Health Communication Strategies for Diverse Populations. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
49. The Manoff Group (2005) Trials of Improved Practices (TIPs): Giving Participants a Voice in Program Design. Washington, DC: The Manoff Group.
50. Bentley, ME, Johnson, SL, Wasser, H et al. (2014) Formative research methods for designing culturally appropriate, integrated child nutrition and development interventions: an overview. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1308, 5467.
51. Diep, CS, Chen, T, Davies, VF et al. (2014) Influence of behavioral theory on fruit and vegetable intervention effectiveness among children. J Nutr Educ Behav 46, 506546.
52. McNulty, J (2013) Challenges and Issues in Nutrition Education. Rome: Nutrition Education and Consumer Awareness Group, FAO.
53. Snyder, LB & Hamilton, MA (2002) Meta-analysis of US health campaign effects on behavior: emphasize enforcement, exposure, and new information, and beware the secular trend. In Public Health Communication: Evidence for Behavior Change, pp. 357384 [R Hornik, editor]. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
54. Pelto, G, Martin, SL, van Liere, MJ et al. (2016) Perspectives and reflections on the practice of behaviour change communication for infant and young child feeding. Matern Child Nutr 12, 245261.
55. Michie, S, Richardson, M, Johnston, M et al. (2013) The behavior change technique taxonomy (v1) of 93 hierarchically clustered techniques: building an international consensus for the reporting of behavior change interventions. Ann Behav Med 46, 8195.
56. Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (2003) Guiding Principles for Complementary Feeding of the Breastfed Child. Washington, DC: PAHO/WHO.
57. UNICEF (2013) Children, ICT and Development: Capturing the Potential, Meeting the Challenges, Innocenti Insight. Florence: UNICEF Office of Research.
58. Steckler, A & Linnan, L (2002) Process Evaluation for Public Health Interventions and Research. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Keywords

Systematic review of the design, implementation and effectiveness of mass media and nutrition education interventions for infant and young child feeding

  • Matthew M Graziose (a1), Shauna M Downs (a2), Quentin O’Brien (a3) and Jessica Fanzo (a4)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed