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The nutrition transition: the same, but different

  • Aydin Nazmi (a1) and Carlos Monteiro (a2)
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References

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5.Popkin, BM, Horton, S, Kim, Set al. (2001) Trends in diet, nutritional status, and diet-related noncommunicable diseases in China and India: the economic costs of the nutrition transition. Nutr Rev 59, 379390.
6.DeVol, R & Bedroussian, A (2007) An Unhealthy America – The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease. Santa Monica, CA: The Milken Institute.
7.Popkin, BM (2002) An overview on the nutrition transition and its health implications: the Bellagio meeting. Public Health Nutr 5, 93103.
8.Monteiro, CA, Gomes, FS & Cannon, G (2010) The snack attack. Am J Public Health 100, 975981.
9.Stuckler, D & Nestle, M (2012) Big food, food systems, and global health. PLoS Med 9, e1001242.
10.Van Hook, J, Altman, C & Balistereri, K (2013) Global patterns in overweight among children and mothers in less developed countries. Public Health Nutr 16, 573–581.
11.Belfki, H, Ben Ali, S, Aounallah-Skhiri, Het al. (2013) Prevalence and determinants of the metabolic syndrome among Tunisian adults: results of the Transition and Health Impact in North Africa (TAHINA) project. Public Health Nutr 16, 582–590.
12.Pereko, K, Setorglo, J, Owusu, Wet al. (2013) Overnutrition and associated factors among adults aged 20 years and above in fishing communities in the urban Cape Coast Metropolis, Ghana. Public Health Nutr 16, 591–595.
13.Zaghloul, S, Al-Hooti, S, Al-Hamad, Net al. (2013) Evidence for nutrition transition in Kuwait: over-consumption of macronutrients and obesity. Public Health Nutr 16, 596–607.
14.Banwell, C, Dixon, J, Seubsman, Set al. (2013) Evolving food retail environments in Thailand and implications for the health and nutrition transition. Public Health Nutr 16, 608–615.
15.Monteiro, CA (2010) The big issue is ultra-processing (commentary). World Nutr 1, 237259.
16.Monteiro, CA & Cannon, G (2012) The impact of transnational ‘Big Food’ companies on the South: a view from Brazil. PLoS Med 9, e1001252.
17.Popkin, BM (2002) The shift in stages of the nutrition transition in the developing world differs from past experiences!. Public Health Nutr 5, 205214.
18.Swinburn, BA (2008) Obesity prevention: the role of policies, laws and regulations. Aust New Zealand Health Policy 5, 2.
19.PLoS Medicine Editors (2012) PLoS Medicine series on Big Food: the food industry is ripe for scrutiny. PLoS Med 9, e1001246.

The nutrition transition: the same, but different

  • Aydin Nazmi (a1) and Carlos Monteiro (a2)

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