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New Zealand breakfast cereals: are there sufficient low-sugar, low-sodium options?

  • Lynne Chepulis (a1) and Gael Mearns (a2)
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References

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1. Levy, G (2017) The New Zealand breakfast cereal category is dynamic and responsive to consumer preferences. Public Health Nutr. Published online: 26 December 2017. doi: 10.1017/S1368980017003688.
2. Chepulis, L, Hill, S & Mearns, G (2017) The nutritional quality of New Zealand breakfast cereals: an update. Public Health Nutr 20, 32343237.
3. Ng, M, Fleming, T, Robinson, M et al. (2014) Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. Lancet 384, 766781.
4. Faulkner, GP, Pourshahidi, LK, Wallace, JMW et al. (2012) Serving size guidance for consumers: is it effective? Proc Nutr Soc 71, 610621.
5. Wansink, B, Van Ittersum, K & Payne, CR (2014) Larger bowl size increases the amount of cereal children request, consume, and waste. J Pediatr 164, 323326.
6. Harris, JL, Schwartz, MB, Ustjanauskas, A et al. (2011) Effects of serving high-sugar cereals on children’s breakfast-eating behavior. Pediatrics 127, 7176.
7. World Health Organization (2015) Guideline: Sugars Intake for Adults and Children. Geneva: WHO.
8. Schusdziarra, V, Hausmann, M, Wittke, C et al. (2011) Impact of breakfast on daily energy intake – an analysis of absolute versus relative breakfast calories. Nutr J 10, 5.
9. Grieger, JA & Cobiac, L (2012) Comparison of dietary intakes according to breakfast choice in Australian boys. Eur J Clin Nutr 66, 667672.
10. Ministry of Health (2012) Food and Nutrition Guidelines for Healthy Children and Young People (Aged 2–18 years): A Background Paper. Partial Revision February 2015. Wellington: Ministry of Health; available at https://www.health.govt.nz/system/files/documents/publications/food-nutrition-guidelines-healthy-children-young-people-background-paper-feb15-v2.pdf
11. Ministry of Health (2003) Food and Nutrition Guidelines for Healthy Adults: A Background Paper. Wellington: Ministry of Health; available at https://www.nzihf.co.nz/media-resources-1/articles/personal%20training-nutrition-guidelines-adults
12. Wilson, N, Signal, L, Nicholls, S et al. (2006) Marketing fat and sugar to children on New Zealand television. Prev Med 42, 96101.
13. Devi, A, Eyles, H, Rayner, M et al. (2014) Nutritional quality, labelling and promotion of breakfast cereals on the New Zealand market. Appetite 81, 253260.
14. Obesity Policy Coalition (2015) Breakfast cereals up to one third sugar: new analysis shows. Health groups call for clear labelling. http://www.opc.org.au/latestnews/mediareleases/pages/breakfast-cereals-up-to-one-third-sugar.aspx#.WnoTlaiWa70 (accessed November 2017).

New Zealand breakfast cereals: are there sufficient low-sugar, low-sodium options?

  • Lynne Chepulis (a1) and Gael Mearns (a2)

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