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Mothers’ experience of fathers’ support for breast-feeding

  • Lauren E Nickerson (a1), Abby C Sykes (a2) and Teresa T Fung (a3)

Abstract

Objective

To examine mothers’ experience of support received from fathers for breast-feeding.

Design

We conducted in-depth in-person interviews with women with recent breast-feeding experience. Interview transcripts were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Interviews were designed to explore the mothers’ perception of role of fathers in breast-feeding, education on breast-feeding that fathers received and their perception of the fathers’ view on breast-feeding.

Setting

Urban and suburban community.

Subjects

Nineteen women from a metropolitan area in the north-eastern USA.

Results

Ten themes emerged, these involved practical and emotional support provided by fathers, especially during times of unexpected breast-feeding challenges. In addition, mothers perceived fathers may benefit from more peer and professional support, lactation consultant service and breast-feeding education.

Conclusions

Mothers appreciated the support from fathers for breast-feeding continuation, including encouragement and understanding. These results may be useful for health-care practitioners to promote breast-feeding continuation by supporting fathers in their role in the breast-feeding process.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email fung@simmons.edu

References

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Keywords

Mothers’ experience of fathers’ support for breast-feeding

  • Lauren E Nickerson (a1), Abby C Sykes (a2) and Teresa T Fung (a3)

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