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A minimally processed dietary pattern is associated with lower odds of metabolic syndrome among Lebanese adults

  • Lara Nasreddine (a1) (a2), Hani Tamim (a3) (a4), Leila Itani (a5), Mona P Nasrallah (a2) (a6), Hussain Isma’eel (a2) (a7), Nancy F Nakhoul (a2) (a6), Joana Abou-Rizk (a1) and Farah Naja (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

To (i) estimate the consumption of minimally processed, processed and ultra-processed foods in a sample of Lebanese adults; (ii) explore patterns of intakes of these food groups; and (iii) investigate the association of the derived patterns with cardiometabolic risk.

Design

Cross-sectional survey. Data collection included dietary assessment using an FFQ and biochemical, anthropometric and blood pressure measurements. Food items were categorized into twenty-five groups based on the NOVA food classification. The contribution of each food group to total energy intake (TEI) was estimated. Patterns of intakes of these food groups were examined using exploratory factor analysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the associations of derived patterns with cardiometabolic risk factors.

Setting

Greater Beirut area, Lebanon.

Subjects

Adults ≥18 years (n 302) with no prior history of chronic diseases.

Results

Of TEI, 36·53 and 27·10 % were contributed by ultra-processed and minimally processed foods, respectively. Two dietary patterns were identified: the ‘ultra-processed’ and the ‘minimally processed/processed’. The ‘ultra-processed’ consisted mainly of fast foods, snacks, meat, nuts, sweets and liquor, while the ‘minimally processed/processed’ consisted mostly of fruits, vegetables, legumes, breads, cheeses, sugar and fats. Participants in the highest quartile of the ‘minimally processed/processed’ pattern had significantly lower odds for metabolic syndrome (OR=0·18, 95 % CI 0·04, 0·77), hyperglycaemia (OR=0·25, 95 % CI 0·07, 0·98) and low HDL cholesterol (OR=0·17, 95 % CI 0·05, 0·60).

Conclusions

The study findings may be used for the development of evidence-based interventions aimed at encouraging the consumption of minimally processed foods.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email fn14@aub.edu.lb

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Keywords

A minimally processed dietary pattern is associated with lower odds of metabolic syndrome among Lebanese adults

  • Lara Nasreddine (a1) (a2), Hani Tamim (a3) (a4), Leila Itani (a5), Mona P Nasrallah (a2) (a6), Hussain Isma’eel (a2) (a7), Nancy F Nakhoul (a2) (a6), Joana Abou-Rizk (a1) and Farah Naja (a1)...

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