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Making Public Health Nutrition relevant to evidence-based action

  • Eric Brunner (a1), Mike Rayner (a2), Margaret Thorogood (a3), Barrie Margetts (a4), Lee Hooper (a5), Carolyn Summerbell (a6), Elizabeth Dowler (a7), Gillian Hewitt (a8), Aileen Robertson (a9) and Martin Wiseman (a10)...
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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email e.brunner@ucl.ac.uk

References

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1Garrow, JS. Would clinical nutrition benefit from meta-analyses and trials registers. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 1992; 46: 843–5.
2Kafatos, AG, Codrington, CA, eds. Eurodiet Reports and Proceedings [special issue]. Public Health Nutr. 2001; 4(2A): 265436.
3Last, JM, ed. A Dictionary of Epidemiology. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.
4Brunner, EJ, White, IR, Thorogood, M, Bristow, A, Curle, D, Marmot, MG. Can dietary interventions change diet and cardiovascular risk factors? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Am. J. Public Health 1997; 87: 1415–22.
5Cutler, JA, Follmann, D, Allender, PS. Randomised trials of sodium reduction: an overview. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 1997; 65: 643S–51S.
6Hooper, L, Summerbell, CD, Higgins, JPT, Thompson, RL, Capps, NE, Davey Smith, G, Riemersma, RA, Ebrahim, S. Dietary fat intake and prevention of cardiovascular disease: systematic review. Br. Med. J. 2001; 322: 757–63.
7Mensink, RP, Katan, MB. Effect of dietary fatty acids on serum lipids and lipoproteins: a meta-analysis of 27 Trials. Art. Thromb. 1992; 12: 911919.
8Committee on Medical Aspects of Food Policy. Nutritional Aspects of the Development of Cancer. London: The Stationery Office, 1998.
9Smith-Warner, SA, Spiegelman, D, Yaun, SS, et al. Intake of fruits and vegetables and risk of breast cancer: a pooled analysis of cohort studies. JAMA 2001; 285: 769–76.
10World Cancer Research Fund. Food, Nutrition and the Prevention of Cancer: A Global Perspective. Washington, DC: American Institute for Cancer Research, 1997.
11Cochrane Library. Oxford: Update Software.
12International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Some Naturally Occurring Substances: Food Items and Constituents, Heterocyclic Amines and Mycotoxins. IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks of Chemicals to Humans Lyon: IARC, 1993; 56.
13Margetts, B, Thompson, RL, Key, T, Duffy, S, Nelson, M, Bingham, S, Wiseman, M. Development of a scoring system to judge the scientific quality of information from case-control and cohort studies of nutrition and cancer. Nutr. Cancer 1995; 24: 231–9.

Making Public Health Nutrition relevant to evidence-based action

  • Eric Brunner (a1), Mike Rayner (a2), Margaret Thorogood (a3), Barrie Margetts (a4), Lee Hooper (a5), Carolyn Summerbell (a6), Elizabeth Dowler (a7), Gillian Hewitt (a8), Aileen Robertson (a9) and Martin Wiseman (a10)...

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