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Knowledge of dietary and behaviour-related determinants of non-communicable disease in urban Senegalese women

  • Michelle Holdsworth (a1), Francis Delpeuch (a1), Edwige Landais (a1), Agnès Gartner (a1), Sabrina Eymard-Duvernay (a1) and Bernard Maire (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

To assess knowledge of dietary and behaviour-related determinants of non-communicable disease (NCD) of urban Senegalese women.

Design

A cross-sectional, population study using an interviewer-administered knowledge questionnaire, developed and validated for this study. The questionnaire consisted of 24 items with six scores measuring knowledge of: (1) diet- and behaviour-related causes of NCD; (2) diet quality–NCD relationship; (3) fruit and vegetable link with NCD; (4) health consequences of obesity; (5) causes of cardiovascular disease (CVD); and (6) causes of certain cancers.

Subjects

A random sample of 301 women aged 20–50 years.

Results

The knowledge scores developed suggest that the health consequences of obesity (mean score of 65.4%) were best understood followed by causes of CVD (mean score of 60.6%), because obesity, smoking, high blood cholesterol and dietary fat were well recognised as risk factors for CVD. Subjects scored least for their knowledge of the protective effect of fruit and vegetables (mean score of 19.9%). Knowledge of causes of certain cancers (mean score of 36.1%) was also low. Women who worked outside the home had better knowledge for two scores but otherwise no relationship was found between knowledge and literacy, formal education or body mass index.

Conclusions

Findings suggest reasonable overall knowledge concerning diet and behaviour with NCD, especially given the relatively new context of the obesity epidemic in Senegal. However, there was poor knowledge of the benefit of eating fruit and vegetables and other preventable causes of certain cancers. Education targeting the benefits of vegetables and fruit may have the greatest impact on NCD prevention.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email holdswor@mpl.ird.fr

References

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Keywords

Knowledge of dietary and behaviour-related determinants of non-communicable disease in urban Senegalese women

  • Michelle Holdsworth (a1), Francis Delpeuch (a1), Edwige Landais (a1), Agnès Gartner (a1), Sabrina Eymard-Duvernay (a1) and Bernard Maire (a1)...

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