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The influence of age and body mass index on relative accuracy of energy intake among Japanese adults

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2007

Hitomi Okubo
Affiliation:
Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes' Project, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo, Japan
Satoshi Sasaki*
Affiliation:
Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes' Project, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo, Japan
Naoko Hirota
Affiliation:
Department of Living Sciences, Nagano Prefectural College, Nagano, Japan
Akiko Notsu
Affiliation:
Tottori College, Tottori, Japan
Hidemi Todoriki
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan
Ayako Miura
Affiliation:
Department of Nutritional Health, Kwassui Women's College, Nagasaki, Japan
Mitsuru Fukui
Affiliation:
Department of Statistics, Osaka City University Medical School, Osaka, Japan
Chigusa Date
Affiliation:
Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, School of Human Environmental Sciences, Mukogawa Women's University, Hyogo, Japan
*
*Corresponding author: Email stssasak@nih.go.jp
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Abstract

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Objective

To examine relationships between the ratio of energy intake to basal metabolic rate (EI/BMR) and age and body mass index (BMI) among Japanese adults.

Design

Energy intake was assessed by 4-day semi-weighed diet records in each of four seasons (16 days in total). The EI/BMR ratio was calculated from reported energy intake and estimated basal metabolic rate as an indicator of reporting accuracy.

Setting

Residents in three areas in Japan, namely Osaka (urban), Nagano (rural inland) and Tottori (rural coastal).

Subjects

One hundred and eighty-three healthy Japanese men and women aged ≥30 years.

Results

The oldest age group (≥60 years) had higher EI/BMR values than the youngest age group (30–39 years) in both sexes (1.74 vs. 1.37 for men; 1.65 vs. 1.43 for women). In multiple regression analyses, age correlated positively (partial correlation coefficient, β = 0.012, P < 0.001 for men; β = 0.011, P < 0.001 for women) and BMI correlated negatively (β = −0.031, P < 0.001 for men; β = −0.025, P < 0.01 for women) with EI/BMR.

Conclusion

Age and BMI may influence the relative accuracy of energy intake among Japanese adults.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2006

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