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Implementation of a multicomponent telemonitoring intervention to improve nutritional status of community-dwelling older adults: a process evaluation

  • Marije N van Doorn-van Atten (a1), Lisette CPGM de Groot (a1), Albert Collet Romea (a2), Simon Schwartz (a2), Jeanne HM de Vries (a1) and Annemien Haveman-Nies (a1) (a3)...

Abstract

Objective

The present study aimed to conduct a process evaluation of a multicomponent nutritional telemonitoring intervention implemented among Dutch community-dwelling older adults.

Design

A mixed-methods approach was employed, guided by the process evaluation framework of the Medical Research Council and the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. The process indicators reach, dose, fidelity and acceptability were measured at several time points within the 6-month intervention among participants and/or nurses.

Setting

The intervention was implemented in the context of two care organisations in the Netherlands.

Subjects

In total, ninety-seven participants (average age 78 years) participated in the intervention and eight nurses were involved in implementation.

Results

About 80 % of participants completed the intervention. Dropouts were significantly older, had worse cognitive and physical functioning, and were more care-dependent. The intervention was largely implemented as intended and received well by participants (satisfaction score 4·1, scale 1–5), but less well by nurses (satisfaction score 3·5, scale 1–5). Participants adhered better to weight telemonitoring than to telemonitoring by means of questionnaires, for which half the participants needed help. Intention to use the intervention was predicted by performance expectancy (β=0·40; 95 % CI 0·13, 0·67) and social influence (β=0·17; 95 % CI 0·00, 0·34). No association between process indicators and intervention outcomes was found.

Conclusions

This process evaluation showed that nutritional telemonitoring among older adults is feasible and accepted by older adults, but nurses’ satisfaction should be improved. The study provided relevant insights for future development and implementation of eHealth interventions among older adults.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email Marije.vandoorn@wur.nl

References

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Keywords

Implementation of a multicomponent telemonitoring intervention to improve nutritional status of community-dwelling older adults: a process evaluation

  • Marije N van Doorn-van Atten (a1), Lisette CPGM de Groot (a1), Albert Collet Romea (a2), Simon Schwartz (a2), Jeanne HM de Vries (a1) and Annemien Haveman-Nies (a1) (a3)...

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