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Food intake patterns and gallbladder disease in Mexican Americans

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2007

Marilyn Tseng
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
Robert F DeVellis
Affiliation:
Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
Kurt R Maurer
Affiliation:
National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA
Meena Khare
Affiliation:
National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA
Lenore Kohlmeier
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
James E Everhart
Affiliation:
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
Robert S Sandler
Affiliation:
Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

Objective

Results of previous studies on diet and gallbladder disease (GBD), defined as having gallstones or having had surgery for gallstones, have been inconsistent. This research examined patterns of food intake in Mexican Americans and their associations with GBD.

Design

Cross-sectional.

Subjects

The study population included 4641 Mexican Americans aged 20–74 years who participated in the 1988–94 third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). GBD was diagnosed by ultrasound. Food intake patterns were identified by principal components analysis based on food frequency questionnaire responses. Component scores representing the level of intake of each pattern were categorized into quartiles, and prevalence odds ratios (POR) were estimated relative to the lowest quartile along with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Results

There were four distinct patterns in women (vegetable, high calorie, traditional, fruit) and three in men (vegetable, high calorie, traditional). After age adjustment, none were associated with GBD in women. However, men in the third (POR = 0.42, 95%CI 0.21–0.85) and fourth (POR = 0.53, 95%CI 0.28–1.01) quartiles of the traditional intake pattern were half as likely to have GBD as those in the lowest quartile.

Conclusions

These findings add to a growing literature suggesting dietary intake patterns can provide potentially useful and relevant information on diet–disease associations. Nevertheless, methods to do so require further development and validation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © CABI Publishing 2000

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