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Estimation of daily intake of polychlorinated biphenyls not similar to dioxins (NDL-PCB) from fish consumption in Spain in different population groups

  • Maria Morales-Suárez-Varela (a1) (a2), Nuria Lopez Santana (a1), Pedro Marti Requena (a3), Mª Isabel Beser Santos (a3), Isabel Peraita-Costa (a1) and Agustin Llopis-Gonzalez (a1) (a2)...

Abstract

Objective

To assess the daily intake of polychlorinated biphenyls not similar to dioxins (NDL-PCB) derived from fish consumption in Spain and compare it with tolerance limits in order to establish a safe threshold so that the nutritional benefits derived from fish consumption may be optimized.

Design

Analysis of NDL-PCB in fish samples and ecological study of the estimated intake of NDL-PCB from fish consumption in different Spanish population groups.

Subjects

National representative sample of the Spanish population.

Results

The intake of NDL-PCB was estimated in two different scenarios: upper bound (UB) and lower bound (LB). Estimating intake using the average concentration of NDL-PCB found in the fish samples, the intake for ‘other children’ is estimated as: 1·80 (UB) and 5·33 (LB) ng/kg per d at the 50th percentile (P50); 7·39 (UB) and 21·94 (LB) ng/kg per d at the 95th percentile (P95) of fish consumption. Estimated NDL-PCB intake shoots up in the toddler group, reaching values of 30·43 (UB) and 90·37 (LB) ng/kg per d at P95. Estimated intake values are lower than those previously estimated in Europe, something expected since in previous studies intake was estimated through total diet. In adults, our estimated values are 1·59 (UB) and 4·72 (LB) ng/kg per d at P50; 4·95 (UB) and 14·72 (LB) ng/kg per d at P95.

Conclusions

NDL-PCB concentration in fish is under the tolerance limits in most samples. However, daily intake in consumers of large quantities of fish should be monitored and special attention should be given to the youngest age groups due to their special vulnerability and higher exposure.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email maria.m.morales@uv.es

References

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Keywords

Estimation of daily intake of polychlorinated biphenyls not similar to dioxins (NDL-PCB) from fish consumption in Spain in different population groups

  • Maria Morales-Suárez-Varela (a1) (a2), Nuria Lopez Santana (a1), Pedro Marti Requena (a3), Mª Isabel Beser Santos (a3), Isabel Peraita-Costa (a1) and Agustin Llopis-Gonzalez (a1) (a2)...

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