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Double burden of underweight and overweight among Bangladeshi adults differs between men and women: evidence from a nationally representative survey

  • Mohammad E Hoque (a1), Md T Hasan (a1), Muntasirur Rahman (a1), Kurt Z Long (a1) (a2) and Abdullah Al Mamun (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

To estimate the prevalence of underweight and overweight among Bangladeshi adults and to determine if the double burden of underweight and overweight differs by gender and other socio-economic characteristics of individuals.

Design

We used data from the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2011. Multinominal logistic regression was used to examine associations between the different nutritional statuses of individuals and related determinants. Interaction effect was checked between gender and various socio-economic factors.

Setting

Nationwide, covering the whole of Bangladesh.

Subjects

Individuals aged >18 years (women, n 16 052; men, n 5090).

Results

Underweight was observed among 28·3 % of men and 24·4 % of women, whereas overweight was observed among 8·4 % of men and 16·9 % of women. The odds of being overweight were significantly lower among urban men (OR=0·46; 95 % CI 0·37, 0·57) compared with urban women, whereas the odds of being underweight were significantly higher among urban men (OR=1·33; 95 % CI 1·07, 1·64) compared with urban women. The odds of being overweight were lower among higher educated men (OR=0·48; 95 % CI 0·39, 0·58) and men of rich households (OR=0·45; 95 % CI 0·37, 0·54) compared with higher educated women and women of rich households, respectively.

Conclusions

There are important gender differences in the prevalence of underweight and overweight among the adult population in Bangladesh. Women with higher education, in rich and urban households have higher chances of being overweight and lower chances of being underweight compared with their male counterparts.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email mohammad.hoque@uqconnect.edu.au

References

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