Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-5nwft Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-18T05:09:33.661Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Dietary intakes and health-related behaviours of Korean American women born in the USA and Korea: The Multiethnic Cohort Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2007

Song-Yi Park*
Affiliation:
Cancer Etiology Program, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, 1236 Lauhala Street, Suite 407, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA
Suzanne P Murphy
Affiliation:
Cancer Etiology Program, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, 1236 Lauhala Street, Suite 407, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA
Sangita Sharma
Affiliation:
Cancer Etiology Program, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, 1236 Lauhala Street, Suite 407, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA
Laurence N Kolonel
Affiliation:
Cancer Etiology Program, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, 1236 Lauhala Street, Suite 407, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA
*
*Corresponding author: Email spark@crch.hawaii.edu
Rights & Permissions [Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Core share and HTML view are not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.
Objective

This study assessed and compared heath-related behaviours and nutrient and food group intakes between US-born and Korea-born Korean American women.

Design and subjects

Cross-sectional analyses were performed for ethnic Koreans who participated in the Multiethnic Cohort Study in Hawaii and Los Angeles in 1993–1996. The sample included 492 Korean American women aged 45–75 years who were born in the USA (n = 274) or Korea (n = 218). Participants were recruited using driver's license files as a primary sampling source and completed a self-administered questionnaire, including a quantitative food frequency section.

Results

The proportion overweight or obese was 31.4% in US-born and 9.4% in Korea-born women. US-born women had higher intakes of total fat and fat as a percentage of energy, and lower intakes of sodium, vitamin C, β-carotene and carbohydrate as a percentage of energy, than Korea-born women. Comparing intakes of food group servings from the Food Guide Pyramid, US-born women reported more whole grains, red meat and nuts, and less soy products, than did Korea-born women. US-born women also consumed fewer vegetables and fruit than those born in Korea. Few women in either group reported intakes that met the recommendations for dairy foods. Intake of discretionary fat from the Pyramid tip was higher in US-born than in Korea-born women.

Conclusions

These findings indicate that the acculturation of Korean immigrants affects dietary intakes in ways that may alter risks of several chronic diseases. Further studies will be necessary to examine the effects of dietary acculturation on disease patterns.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2005

References

1Satia-Abouta, J, Patterson, RE, Neuhouser, ML, Elder, J. Dietary acculturation: applications to nutrition research and dietetics. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2002; 102: 1105–18.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2Kin, K, Lee, JH, Kushida, K, Sartoris, DJ, Ohmura, A, Clopton, PL, et al. Bone density and body composition on the Pacific rim: a comparison between Japan-born and US-born Japanese-American women. Journal of Bone Mineral Research 1993; 8: 861–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3Huang, B, Rodriguez, BL, Burchfiel, CM, Chyou, PH, Curb, JD, Yano, K. Acculturation and prevalence of diabetes among Japanese-American men in Hawaii. American Journal of Epidemiology 1996; 144: 674–81.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4Davis, J, Busch, J, Hammatt, Z, Novotny, R, Harrigan, R, Grandinetti, A, et al. The relationship between ethnicity and obesity in Asian and Pacific Islander populations: a literature review. Ethnicity & Disease 2004; 14: 111–8.Google ScholarPubMed
5US Census Bureau. The Asian population: 2000, Census 2000 brief [online]. Available at http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-16.pdf. Accessed 10 March 2005.Google Scholar
6Kim, KK, Kohrs, MB, Twork, R, Grier, MR. Dietary calcium intakes of elderly Korean Americans. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 1984; 84: 164–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7Kim, KK, Yu, ES, Liu, WT, Kim, J, Kohrs, MB. Nutritional status of Chinese-, Korean-, and Japanese-American elderly. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 1993; 93: 1416–22.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8Kim, KK, Yu, ES, Chen, EH, Cross, N, Kim, J, Brintnall, RA. Nutritional status of Korean Americans: implications for cancer risk. Oncology Nursing Forum 2000; 27: 1573–83.Google ScholarPubMed
9Cross, NA, Kim, KK, Yu, ES, Chen, EH, Kim, J. Assessment of the diet quality of middle-aged and older adult Korean Americans living in Chicago. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2002; 102: 552–4.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10Park, SY, Paik, HY, Skinner, JD, Spindler, AA, Park, HR. Nutrient intake of Korean-American, Korean, and American adolescents. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2004; 104: 242–5.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11Kim, J, Chan, MM, Shore, RE. Development and validation of a food frequency questionnaire for Korean Americans. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition 2002; 53: 129–42.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12Lee, SK, Sobal, J, Frongillo, EA Jr. Acculturation and dietary practices among Korean Americans. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 1999; 99: 1084–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13Lee, SK, Sobal, J, Frongillo, EA Jr. Acculturation, food consumption, and diet-related factors among Korean Americans. Journal of Nutrition Education 1999; 31: 321–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14Park, SY, Paik, HY, Skinner, JD, Ok, SW, Spinder, AA. Mothers' acculturation and eating behaviors of Korean American families in California. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior 2003; 35: 142–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
15Kim, J, Chan, MM. Acculturation and dietary habits of Korean Americans. British Journal of Nutrition 2004; 91: 469–78.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
16Nordyke, EC. The Peopling of Hawaii. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1989.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17Park, IH. Korean Immigrants and US Immigration Policy. Honolulu: East – West Center, 1990.Google Scholar
18Song, YJ, Hofstetter, CR, Hovell, MF, Paik, HY, Park, HR, Lee, J, et al. Acculturation and health risk behaviors among Californians of Korean decent. Preventive Medicine 2004; 39: 147–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19Kolonel, LN, Henderson, BE, Hankin, JH, Nomura, AM, Wilkens, LR, Pike, MC, et al. A multiethnic cohort in Hawaii and Los Angeles: baseline characteristics. American Journal of Epidemiology 2000; 151: 346–57.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
20Stram, DO, Hankin, JH, Wilkens, LR, Pike, MC, Monroe, KR, Park, S, et al. Calibration of the dietary questionnaire for a multiethnic cohort in Hawaii and Los Angeles. American Journal of Epidemiology 2000; 151: 358–70.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
21United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The Food Guide Pyramid. Home and Garden Bulletin No. 252. Washington, DC: USDA, 1992.Google Scholar
22United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Documentation: Pyramid Servings Database for USDA Survey Food Codes [online]. USDA, Agricultural Research Service, 2000. Available at http://www.ba.ars.usda.gov/cnrg/services/toc.html. Accessed 10 March 2005.Google Scholar
23Sharma, S, Murphy, SP, Wilkens, LR, Au, D, Shen, L, Kolonel, LN. Extending a multiethnic food composition table to include standardized food group servings. Journal of Food Composition and Analysis 2003; 16: 485–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
24Sharma, S, Murphy, SP, Wilkens, LR, Shen, L, Hankin, JH, Henderson, B, et al. Adherence to the Food Guide Pyramid recommendations among Japanese Americans, Native Hawaiians, and whites: results from the Multiethnic Cohort Study. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2003; 103: 1195–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
25Sharma, S, Murphy, SP, Wilkens, LR, Shen, L, Hankin, JH, Monroe, KR, et al. Adherence to the Food Guide Pyramid Recommendations among African Americans and Latinos: results from the Multiethnic Cohort Study. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2004; 104: 1873–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
26SAS Institute Inc. SAS Statistical Software System, Version 8.02. Cary, NC: SAS Institute Inc., 2001.Google Scholar
27Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrates, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2002.Google Scholar
28Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Fluoride. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1997.Google Scholar
29Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2001.Google Scholar
30Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2000.Google Scholar
31Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1999.Google Scholar
32Gordon, BH, Kang, MS, Cho, P, Sucher, KP. Dietary habits and health beliefs of Korean-Americans in the San Francisco Bay Area. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2000; 100: 1198–201.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
33Yang, EJ, Kim, WY, Song, WO. Health risks in relation to dietary changes in Korean Americans. Korean Journal of Dietary Culture 2001; 16: 515–24 (in Korean).Google Scholar
34World Health Organization (WHO). Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases. Report of the Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation. WHO Technical Report Series, No. 916. Geneva: WHO, 2003. Also available at http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/publications/trs916/download/en/Google Scholar
35Lauderdale, DS, Rathouz, PJ. Body mass index in a US national sample of Asian Americans: effects of nativity, years since immigration and socioeconomic status. International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders 2000; 24: 1188–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
36Wismer, BA, Moskowitz, JM, Chen, AM, Kang, SH, Novotny, TE, Min, K, et al. . Rates and independent correlates of Pap smear testing among Korean-American women. American Journal of Public Health 1998; 88: 656–60.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
37United States Department of Health and Human Services and United States Department, of Agriculture. Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 [online]. Available at http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/. Accessed 10 March 2005.Google Scholar
38Schultz, JD, Spindler, AA, Josephson, RV. Diet and acculturation in Chinese women. Journal of Nutrition Education 1994; 26: 266–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
39Yang, W, Read, M. Dietary pattern changes of Asian immigrants. Nutrition Research 1996; 16: 1277–93.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
40Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2004.Google Scholar