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Diet patterns and the risk of renal cell carcinoma

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2007


Kiren Handa
Affiliation:
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Nancy Kreiger
Affiliation:
Division of Preventive Oncology, Cancer Care Ontario, 620 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaM5G 2L7 Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario
Corresponding

Abstract

Objectives:

Our objective was to identify food intake patterns that might be associated with the risk of renal cell carcinoma.

Design:

A total of 461 cases (210 females, 251 males) were age frequency matched to population controls. Diet factors were created using factor analysis of 69 food items from a food-frequency questionnaire. These factors were modelled using logistic regression to identify those associated with renal cell carcinoma.

Setting:

We investigated the role of diet in the aetiology of renal cell carcinoma using a population-based case–control study conducted in Ontario between 1995 and 1996.

Subjects:

Cases were Ontario residents 20 to 74 years of age identified through review of pathology reports in the Ontario Cancer Registry.

Results:

A ‘dessert’ diet factor was positively associated with disease for both sexes (odds ratio estimate (OR) for males = 3.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0–6.9; OR for females = 1.4, 95% CI 0.8–2.2, for the highest vs. lowest quartile). In males, a ‘beef’ diet factor was identified and was associated with an increased risk of renal cell carcinoma. Furthermore, a ‘juices’ diet factor also showed an association with increased risk in males ( OR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.0–3.1). For females, a positive association was observed between renal cell carcinoma and an ‘unhealthy’ diet factor ( OR = 1.4, 95% CI 0.8–2.4).

Conclusions:

Our findings confirmed that high-fat and high-protein diets might be risk factors for renal cell carcinoma. The data also suggest an increased risk associated with juice intake, a finding not previously reported.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © CABI Publishing 2002

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