Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Developing a nutrition intervention in children's centres: exploring views of parents in rural/urban settings in the UK

  • Heather R Ohly (a1), Arabella Hayter (a2), Clare Pettinger (a3), Hynek Pikhart (a2), Richard G Watt (a2) and Gail A Rees (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

The present study explored parents’ requirements for healthy eating support prior to the development of a tailored intervention.

Design

A cross-sectional study of parents attending children's centres.

Setting

Children's centres in Cornwall (rural south-west England) and Islington (urban London borough).

Subjects

A total of 261 parents (94·2 % female) of pre-school children (aged 2–5 years) completed a questionnaire on factors influencing food choice, and preferences for and views on healthy eating support.

Results

Parents reported that health, taste, freshness and quality were the most important factors influencing their food choices for their pre-school children. The importance of individual factors varied according to level of educational attainment. Over a third (38 %) of parents said they wanted more advice on healthy eating for children. Less educated parents showed the greatest interest in learning more about several aspects: what a ‘healthy diet’ means, how to prepare and cook healthy food, how to understand food labels, budgeting for food, examples of healthy food and snacks for children, appropriate portion sizes for children and ways to encourage children to eat well.

Conclusions

There was demand for healthy eating support among parents of pre-school children, especially those who are less educated, in one rural and one urban area of England.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Developing a nutrition intervention in children's centres: exploring views of parents in rural/urban settings in the UK
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Developing a nutrition intervention in children's centres: exploring views of parents in rural/urban settings in the UK
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Developing a nutrition intervention in children's centres: exploring views of parents in rural/urban settings in the UK
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email gail.rees@plymouth.ac.uk

References

Hide All
1.Bates, B, Lennox, A, Bates, Cet al. (2011) National Diet and Nutrition Survey: Headline results from Years 1 and 2 (combined) of the Rolling Programme (2008/2009–2009/10). London: Food Standards Agency and Department of Health.
2.Crawley, H (2006) Eating Well for Under 5s in Child Care. Practical and Nutritional Guidelines. St Austell: Caroline Walker Trust.
3.Klesges, RC, Stein, RJ, Eck, LHet al. (1991) Parental influence on food selection in young children and its relationship to childhood obesity. Am J Clin Nutr 53, 859864.
4.Friel, S, Kelleher, C, Campbell, Pet al. (1999) Evaluation of the Nutrition Education at Primary School (NEAPS) programme. Public Health Nutr 2, 549555.
5.Sacher, PM, Chadwick, P, Wells, JCKet al. (2005) Assessing the acceptability and feasibility of the MEND programme in a small group of obese 7–11-year-old children. J Hum Nutr Diet 18, 35.
6.Moore, L, Moore, GF, Tapper, Ket al. (2007) Free breakfasts in schools: design and conduct of a cluster randomised controlled trial of the Primary School Free Breakfast Initiative in Wales. BMC Public Health 7, 258.
7.National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (2008) Improving the Nutrition of Pregnant and Breastfeeding Mothers and Children in Low-Income Households. NICE Public Health Guidance no. 11. London: NICE.
8.Sacher, P, Wolman, J, Chadwick, Pet al. (2008) Mini-MEND: MEND's early years healthy lifestyle programme for 2–4 year olds and their families. Nutr Bull 33, 364367.
9.Hardy, S, Lowe, A, Unadkat, Aet al. (2010) Mini-MEND: an obesity prevention initiative in a children's centre. Community Pract 83, 2629.
10.de Silva-Sanigorski, AM, Bell, AC, Kremer, Pet al. (2010) Reducing obesity in early childhood: results from Romp & Chomp, an Australian community-wide intervention program. Am J Clin Nutr 91, 831840.
11.Haire-Joshu, D, Elliott, MB, Caito, NMet al. (2008) High 5 for kids: the impact of a home visiting program on fruit and vegetable intake of parents and their preschool children. Prev Med 47, 7782.
12.Fraser, K, Wallis, M & St John, W (2004) Improving children's problem eating and mealtime behaviours: an evaluative study of a single session parent education programme. Health Educ J 63, 229241.
13.Office for Standards in Education, Department for Education and Skills & Food Standards Agency (2004) Starting Early: Food and Nutrition Education of Young Children. Manchester: Ofsted Publications Centre.
14.McCaffree, J (2003) Childhood eating patterns: the role parents play. J Am Diet Assoc 103, 1587.
15.Barker, M, Lawrence, WT, Skinner, TCet al. (2008) Constraints on food choices of women in the UK with lower educational attainment. Public Health Nutr 11, 12291237.
16.Cornwall County Council (not dated) A Professional Guide to Children's Centres in Cornwall. Gendall: Cornwall County Council.
17.Department for Communities and Local Government (2007) The English Indices of Deprivation 2007. London: Department for Communities and Local Government.
18.Office for National Statistics (2003) 2001 Census: Census Area Statistics. http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/census/census-2001/index.html (accessed July 2010).
19.Williden, M, Taylor, R, McAuley, Ket al. (2006) The APPLE project: an investigation of the barriers and promoters of healthy eating and physical activity in New Zealand children aged 5–12 years. Health Educ J 65, 135148.
20.Clark, HR, Goyder, E, Bissell, Pet al. (2008) A pilot survey of socio-economic differences in child-feeding behaviours among parents of primary-school children. Public Health Nutr 11, 10301036.
21.Steptoe, A, Pollard, TM & Wardle, J (1995) Development of a measure of the motives underlying the selection of food – The Food Choice Questionnaire. Appetite 25, 267284.
22.Hampson, SE, Martin, J, Jorgensen, Jet al. (2009) A social marketing approach to improving the nutrition of low-income women and children: an initial focus group study. Public Health Nutr 12, 15631568.
23.Alderson, TSJ & Ogden, J (1999) What do mothers feed their children and why? Health Educ Res 14, 717727.
24.Crombie, I, Kiezebrink, K, Irvine, Let al. (2009) What maternal factors influence the diet of 2-year-old children living in deprived areas? A cross-sectional survey. Public Health Nutr 12, 12541260.
25.Vereecken, C, Keukelier, E & Maes, L (2004) Influence of mother's educational level on food parenting practices and food habits of young children. Appetite 43, 93103.
26.Sausenthaler, S, Kompauer, I, Mielck, Aet al. (2007) Impact of parental education and income inequality on children's food intake. Public Health Nutr 10, 2433.

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed