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Details and acceptability of a nutrition intervention programme designed to improve the contents of children’s packed lunches

  • Christine L Cleghorn (a1), Charlotte EL Evans (a1), Meaghan S Kitchen (a1) and Janet E Cade (a1)

Abstract

Objective

To describe the ‘Smart Lunch Box’ intervention and provide details on feedback from the participants on the acceptability and usability of the intervention materials.

Design

A cluster randomised controlled trial, randomised by school. English schools were stratified on percentage free-school-meals eligibility and attainment at Key Stage 2. A ‘Smart Lunch Box’ with supporting materials and activities on healthy eating was delivered to parents and children via schools in the intervention group. Feedback forms containing information on a total of fifteen intervention items were filled out by the parents and/or children participating in the intervention and were collected after each of the three phases of the intervention.

Setting

Eighty-nine primary schools in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, randomly selected; forty-four schools in the intervention arm.

Subjects

A total of 1294 children, aged 9–10 years, took part in the trial. Of the 604 children in the intervention arm, 343 provided feedback after at least one of the three phases.

Results

A median of twelve items out of a total of fifteen were used by responders. The two intervention items most likely to be used were the individual food boxes and the cooler bags. Whether a participant liked an item significantly affected whether they used it for all items except the cooler bag, fruity face and individual food boxes.

Conclusions

Practical intervention items aimed at parents are likely to be used in the longer term and therefore may be appropriate for use in an intervention strategy to improve packed lunches.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email c.l.cleghorn@leeds.ac.uk

References

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