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BMI and all-cause mortality among middle-aged and older adults in Taiwan: a population-based cohort study

  • Wei-Sheng Chung (a1) (a2), Feng-Ming Ho (a3), Nan-Cheng Cheng (a1), Meng-Chih Lee (a4) and Chih-Jung Yeh (a5)...

Abstract

Objective

The present study investigates the relationship between BMI and all-cause mortality among middle-aged and older adults with or without pre-existing diseases.

Design

A population-based cohort study.

Setting

The Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging is a nationwide prospective cohort study comprising a representative random sample of middle-aged and older adults. The study period was 1996–2007.

Subjects

We followed 4145 middle-aged and older adults, totalling 42 353 person-years.

Results

Overweight and mildly obese participants showed a 16 % and 30 % decrease in the risk of death, respectively, compared with those of normal weight after adjusting for potential covariates (e.g. demographic characteristics, health behaviour, co-morbidities and physical function). Underweight adults showed a 1·36-fold increased adjusted hazard ratio of death compared with normal-weight adults. Adults with a BMI of 27·0–28·0 kg/m2 showed a significantly lower adjusted hazard ratio of all-cause mortality rate compared with adults who had normal BMI values when they had coexisting hypertension or diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio=0·50; 95 % CI 0·30, 0·81 for hypertension and adjusted hazard ratio=0·41; 95 % CI 0·18, 0·89 for diabetes).

Conclusions

The study demonstrates that underweight people have a higher risk of death, and overweight and mildly obese people have a lower risk of death, compared with people of normal weight among middle-aged and older adults. An optimal BMI may be based on the individual, who exhibits pre-existing diseases or not.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding authors: Email chung.w53@msa.hinet.net, alexyeh@csmu.edu.tw

References

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