Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Beneficial effects of short-term nutritional counselling at the primary health-care level among Brazilian adults

  • Daniela Saes Sartorelli (a1), Elaine Cristina Sciarra (a1), Laércio Joel Franco (a2) and Marly Augusto Cardoso (a1)

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the impact of a low-cost nutritional intervention in changing the lifestyle of adults.

Design

Randomised clinical trial.

Setting

Primary health-care centre in São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo State, Brazil.

Subjects

We randomly assigned 104 adults (83 women and 21 men aged 30–65 years, body mass index 24–35 kg m−2, non-diabetic) into two groups: nutrition counselling and control. Each subject in the intervention group received three individualised nutritional counselling sessions during the first 6 months aimed at increasing intakes of fruits, vegetables and olive oil, reducing saturated fat and improving physical activity. Body composition, biochemical indicators and lifestyle were assessed at baseline and at 6 months and 1 year in both groups.

Results

After 6 months of follow-up, body weight, waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total and saturated fat, and dietary energy and cholesterol levels showed a more significant decrease among subjects in the intervention group than in the control group (P<05). Moreover, the intervention group showed significantly greater improvement in each intervention goal, such as reduced intake of saturated fat and increased intakes of fruits, vegetables, fibre and olive oil (P<0.05). After 12 months of follow-up, most of the outcomes were maintained.

Conclusions

The low-cost nutritional intervention programme improved serum lipids profile and weight control, and appeared to be feasible for use at a primary health-care centre in a developing country.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Beneficial effects of short-term nutritional counselling at the primary health-care level among Brazilian adults
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Beneficial effects of short-term nutritional counselling at the primary health-care level among Brazilian adults
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Beneficial effects of short-term nutritional counselling at the primary health-care level among Brazilian adults
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email marlyac@usp.br

References

Hide All
1King, H, Aubert, RE, Herman, WH. Global burden of diabetes, 1995–2025. Diabetes Care 1998; 21: 1414–31.
2World Health Organization (WHO)/Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases. Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation. Geneva: WHO//FAO, 2003.
3Diabetes Prevention Program Group. Reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes with lifestyle intervention or metformin. New England Journal of Medicine 2002; 346: 393403.
4Tuomilehto, J, Lindstrom, J, Eriksson, JG, Valle, TT, Hamalainen, H, Iianne-Parika, P, et al. for The Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study Group. Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus by changes in lifestyle among subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. New England Journal of Medicine 2001; 344: 1343–50.
5American Diabetes Association and National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases. The prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care 2001; 25: 742–9.
6Alberti, KGMM, Zimmet, PZ. for the WHO Consultation. Definition, diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Part 1: diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus. Provisional report of a WHO consultation Diabetic Medicine 1998; 15: 539–53.
7Cardoso, MA, Kida, AA, Tomita, LY, Stocco, PR. Reproducibility and relative validity of a food frequency questionnaire among women of Japanese ancestry living in Brazil. Nutrition Research 2001; 21: 725–33.
8Ribeiro, AB, Cardoso, MA. Development of a food frequency questionnaire as a tool for programs of chronic diseases prevention. Revista de Nutricao 2002; 15: 201–7. (in Portuguese).
9Block, G, Coyle, LM, Hartman, AM, Scoppa, SM. Revision of dietary analysis software for the health habits and history questionnaire. American Journal of Epidemiology 1994; 139: 1190–6.
10Wing, RR, Venditti, E, Jakicic, JM, Polley, BA, Lang, W. Lifestyle intervention in overweight individual with a family history of diabetes. Diabetes Care 1998; 21: 350–9.
11Tang, JL, Armitage, JM, Lancaster, T, Silagy, CA, Fowler, GH, Neil, HAW. Systematic review of dietary intervention trials to lower blood total cholesterol in free-living subjects. British Medical Journal 1998; 316: 1213–20.
12Lindstrom, J, Louheranta, A, Mannelin, M, Rastas, M, Salminen, V, Eriksson, J, et al. for the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study Group. Lifestyle intervention and 3-year results on diet and physical activity. Diabetes Care 2003; 26: 3230–6.
13Law, MR, Wald, NJ, Thompson, SG. By how much and how quickly does reduction in serum cholesterol concentration lower risk of ischaemic heart disease? British Medical Journal 1994; 308: 367–72.
14Bergholm, R, Tiikkainen, M, Vehkavara, S, Tamminen, M, Teramo, K, Rissanen, A, et al. Lowering of LDL cholesterol rather than moderate weight loss improves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in obese women with previous gestational diabetes. Diabetes Care 2003; 26: 1667–72.
15John, JH, Ziebland, S, Yudkin, P, Roe, LS. Neil HAW for the Oxford Fruit and Vegetable Study Group. Effects of fruit and vegetable consumption on plasma antioxidant concentrations and blood pressure: a randomized controlled trial. Lancet 2002; 359: 1969–74.
16Manson, JE, Hu, FB, Rich-Edwards, JW, Colditz, GA, Stampfer, MJ, Willett, WC, et al. A prospective study of walking as compared with vigorous exercise in the prevention of coronary heart disease in women. New England Journal of Medicine 1999; 341: 650–8.

Keywords

Beneficial effects of short-term nutritional counselling at the primary health-care level among Brazilian adults

  • Daniela Saes Sartorelli (a1), Elaine Cristina Sciarra (a1), Laércio Joel Franco (a2) and Marly Augusto Cardoso (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed