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Associations of home food availability, dietary intake, screen time and physical activity with BMI in young American-Indian children

  • Chrisa Arcan (a1), Peter J Hannan (a1), Jayne A Fulkerson (a2), John H Himes (a1), Bonnie Holy Rock (a1), Mary Smyth (a1) and Mary Story (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate associations between home environmental factors and BMI of young American-Indian children.

Design

Cross-sectional and prospective study.

Setting

School-based obesity prevention trial (Bright Start) on a Northern Plains Indian reservation in South Dakota. Mixed model multivariable analysis was used to examine associations between child BMI categories (normal, overweight and obese) and home food availability, children's dietary intake and physical activity. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, socio-economic status, parent BMI and school; prospective analyses also adjusted for study condition and baseline predictor and outcome variables.

Subjects

Kindergarten children (n 424, 51 % male; mean age = 5·8 years, 30 % overweight/obese) and parents/caregivers (89 % female; 86 % overweight/obese) had their height and weight measured and parents/caregivers completed surveys on home environmental factors (baseline and 2 years later).

Results

Higher fast-food intake and parent-perceived barriers to physical activity were marginally associated with higher probabilities of a child being overweight and obese. Vegetable availability was marginally associated with lower probabilities of being overweight and obese. The associations between home environmental factors and child weight status at follow-up were not significant.

Conclusions

Findings indicate that selected aspects of the home environment are associated with weight status of American-Indian children. Obesity interventions with this population should consider helping parents to engage and model healthful behaviours and to increase availability of healthful foods at home.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email arca0021@umn.edu

References

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Keywords

Associations of home food availability, dietary intake, screen time and physical activity with BMI in young American-Indian children

  • Chrisa Arcan (a1), Peter J Hannan (a1), Jayne A Fulkerson (a2), John H Himes (a1), Bonnie Holy Rock (a1), Mary Smyth (a1) and Mary Story (a1)...

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