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Associations of dietary patterns with hypertension among adults in Jilin Province, China: a structural equation modelling approach

  • Junsen Ye (a1) (a2), Yaogai Lv (a1), Zhongmin Li (a1), Yan Yao (a1) and Lina Jin (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

To explore the direct and indirect associations of dietary patterns with hypertension using structural equation modelling (SEM).

Design

Factor analysis with varimax rotation was used to classify different dietary patterns and SEM was employed to investigate the associations of dietary patterns with hypertension. Total cholesterol to HDL-cholesterol (TC:HDL-C) ratio and LDL-cholesterol to HDL-cholesterol (LDL-C:HDL-C) ratio were used as observed indicator variables of the lipid latent variable. Waist circumference, body fat percentage and BMI, which were associated with hypertension, were used as observed indicator variables of the obesity latent variable.

Setting

International Chronic Disease Cohort (ICDC) that began in 2005 with the purpose of describing the frequency and determinants of chronic diseases in Jilin Province, China.

Participants

A total of 1492 adults (40–79 years) were enrolled in the baseline study from August 2010 to August 2011.

Results

Hypertension prevalence in our study population was 34·9 %. It was found that the wine pattern, condiment pattern, obesity latent variable, lipid latent variable, glucose, age and family history of hypertension were factors that had an association with hypertension via SEM, and the corresponding coefficients were 0·056, 0·011, 0·230, 0·281, 0·098, 0·232 and 0·116, respectively.

Conclusions

The wine pattern and lipid latent variable had positive direct associations with hypertension. The condiment pattern had a positive indirect association with hypertension via the obesity latent variable. The vegetables pattern, modern pattern and snack pattern were not associated with hypertension.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Corresponding authors: Email yaoyan@jlu.edu.cn; jinln@jlu.edu.cn

Footnotes

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Junsen Ye and Yaogai Lv contributed equally to this article.

Footnotes

References

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