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Assessment of intake inadequacy and food sources of zinc of people in China

  • Guansheng Ma (a1) (a2), Yanping Li (a1) (a2), Ying Jin (a1), Songming Du (a1), Frans J Kok (a2) and Xiaoguang Yang (a1)...

Abstract

Objectives

To assess the intake inadequacy and food sources of zinc of people in China.

Design and subjects

Diets of 68 962 subjects aged 2–101 years (urban 21 103, rural 47 859) in the 2002 China National Nutrition and Health Survey were analysed. Dietary intake was assessed using 24-hour recall for three consecutive days. Zinc intake inadequacy was calculated based on values suggested by the World Health Organization.

Results

The median zinc intake ranged from 4.9 mg day− 1 (urban girls, 2–3 years) to 11.9 mg day− 1 (rural males, 19+ years). The zinc density of urban residents (2–3 to 19+ years) was 5.0–5.3 mg day− 1 (1000 kcal)− 1, significantly higher than that of their rural counterparts (4.7–4.8 mg day− 1 (1000 kcal)− 1). Differences in food sources of zinc from cereal grains (27.4–45.1 vs. 51.6–63.2%) and animal foods (28.4–54.8 vs. 16.8–30.6%) were found between urban and rural residents. Zinc from vegetables and fruits (8.2–13.8 vs. 9.7–12.4%) and legumes (1.3–3.3 vs. 2.5–3.4%) was comparable between urban and rural residents. The proportion of zinc intake inadequacy ranged between 2.8% (urban females, 19+ years) and 29.4% (rural lactating women). Rural residents had higher proportions of zinc intake inadequacy than their urban counterparts. Significantly higher proportions of zinc inadequacy were found in the category of phytate/zinc molar ratio >15 for both rural and urban residents.

Conclusions

About 20% of rural children are at risk of inadequate zinc intake, with phytate as a potential important inhibitor. Moreover, lactating women are also considered a vulnerable group.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email mags@chinacdc.net.cn

References

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