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Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are associated with liver injury markers in the US adult population

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2020

Xiaowei He
Affiliation:
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism/Diabetes Care and Research Center, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Geriatric Hospital/Jiangsu Province Geriatric Hospital, Jiangsu Province Official Hospital/Jiangsu Province Institute of Geriatrics, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China
Cheng Xu
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, Center for Global Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China
Zheng-Hong Lu
Affiliation:
Department of Gerontology, The Affiliated Huaian No. 1 People’s Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Huai’an, Jiangsu 223300, People’s Republic of China
Xiao-Zheng Fang
Affiliation:
Department of Gerontology, The Affiliated Huaian No. 1 People’s Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Huai’an, Jiangsu 223300, People’s Republic of China
Juan Tan
Affiliation:
Department of Gerontology, The Affiliated Huaian No. 1 People’s Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Huai’an, Jiangsu 223300, People’s Republic of China
Yingjian Song
Affiliation:
Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Affiliated Huaian No. 1 People’s Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Huai’an 223300, People’s Republic of China
Corresponding

Abstract

Objective:

To examine the associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and serum liver enzymes in a representative sample of US adults.

Design:

The cross-sectional study sample consisted of 24 229 adults with data on serum 25(OH)D levels and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma-glutamyl transaminase (GGT) concentrations, in addition to data on other potential confounders. Multivariate logistic regression and linear regression were applied to assess the associations between serum 25(OH)D levels and ALT, AST, ALP and GGT concentrations.

Setting:

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2001–2006.

Participants:

The cross-sectional study sample consisted of 24 229 adults.

Results:

We found a significant association between low serum 25(OH)D levels (<30 nmol/l) and ALP levels in all participants (OR 2·67; 95 % CI 1·98, 3·59; P < 0·001), a confirmed healthy population (OR 3·02; 95 % CI 2·25, 4·07; P < 0·001) and individuals with viral hepatitis (OR 2·87; 95 % CI 1·52, 5·44; P = 0·006) compared with those who had normal 25(OH)D levels (>50 nmol/l). Moreover, in both the logistic regression and linear regression, the associations between 25(OH)D levels and ALP levels were stronger in the subgroups with obesity. No association was present between ALT, AST or GGT levels and serum 25(OH)D levels in this population.

Conclusions:

The results of the present study provide epidemiological evidence that vitamin D deficiency is associated with liver ALP levels in humans. This finding suggests a potential adverse effect of low 25(OH)D levels on human liver function. However, the underlying mechanisms still need further investigation.

Type
Research paper
Copyright
© The Authors 2020

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Footnotes

These authors contributed equally to the present study and should be regarded as joint first authors.

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