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Excavation of a Bronze Age Unenclosed Cemetery, Cairns, and Field Boundaries at Eaglestone Flat, Curbar, Derbyshire, 1984, 1989–1990

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 February 2014

John Barnatt
Affiliation:
Peak National Park, Aldern House, Baslow Road, Bakewell Derbyshire DE45 1AE
Pauline Beswick
Affiliation:
City Museum, Weston Park, Sheffield, South Yorkshire S10 2TP
Frank M. Chambers
Affiliation:
Environmental Research Unit, The Geography Department, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG
John Evans
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of East London
Daryl Garton
Affiliation:
Trent & Peak Archaeological Trust, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD
Jacqueline I. Mckinley
Affiliation:
12 Victoria Road, Warminster, Wiltshire
Ken Smith
Affiliation:
Peak National Park, Aldern House, Baslow Road, Bakewell Derbyshire DE45 IAE
Alison Walster
Affiliation:
City Museum, Weston Park, Sheffield, South Yorkshire S10 2TP

Abstract

Excavations at Eaglestone Flat, on the gritstone eastern uplands of the Peak District, have revealed a Bronze Age cremation cemetery associated with a number of contemporaneous stone structures built for ritual and agricultural purposes. Some of the burials were within urns, mostly cordoned. Others were simply placed in pits whilst still hot. A minority were deposited in direct association with small cairns, either placed under or within them. The majority were on open ground near the stone features and adjacent to the upslope edge of a prehistoric field. Most of the stone structures are clearance features associated with the preparation and cultivation of the land close by over an extended period. They are found in a complex palimpsest, which includes structures of unusual design, such as retained rectangular platforms, and discontinuous walls that were only ever 1–2 courses high and probably surmounted by low banks. A series of radiocarbon results adds to knowledge of the date at which Peak District cairnftelds and field systems were built. Environmental data allows vegetational sequences to be reconstructed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Prehistoric Society 1994

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Excavation of a Bronze Age Unenclosed Cemetery, Cairns, and Field Boundaries at Eaglestone Flat, Curbar, Derbyshire, 1984, 1989–1990
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