Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-sbl5v Total loading time: 1.172 Render date: 2022-10-06T21:31:09.918Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Cellular in vitro bioactivity of protein hydrolysates from brewers' spent grain

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2013

A. L. McCarthy
Affiliation:
School Of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Ireland
Y. C. Ocallaghan
Affiliation:
School Of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Ireland
A. Connolly
Affiliation:
Department of Life Sciences, University of Limerick, Ireland
C. O. Piggott
Affiliation:
Department of Life Sciences, University of Limerick, Ireland
R. J. Fitzgerald
Affiliation:
Department of Life Sciences, University of Limerick, Ireland
N. M. Obrien
Affiliation:
School Of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Ireland
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2013 

Protein hydrolysates have been used as components of nutrition products, including geriatric and sports products, and in weight-control diets( Reference McCarthy, OCallaghan and OBrien 1 ). Brewers' spent grain (BSG), a co-product of the brewing industry, represents a unique source of protein hydrolysates. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro bioactivity of BSG hydrolysates and fractionated hydrolysates.

Hydrolysates (designated U-W) were prepared from BSG using either Alcalase 2.4L, Corolase PP or Flavourzyme. Cytotoxicity was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in both U937 and Jurkat T cells. The antioxidant activity of the hydrolysates was determined in U937 cells by two methods – ability to protect against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced (100 μM 60 min) oxidative stress, by the SOD assay and H2O2-induced (50 μM×30 min) DNA damage, by the comet assay. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure the effect of the samples on concanavalin-A (con-A) stimulated production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in Jurkat T cells, indicating their immunomodulatory potential.

Values are mean of three independent experiments. Statistical analysis by ANOVA followed by Dunnett's test. * Denotes significant difference in SOD activity/DNA damage, relative to control (P<0.05). # Denotes significant difference in SOD activity/DNA damage, relative to H2O2 control (P<0.01). † Denotes significant reduction in IFN-γ production, relative to control (P<0.05).

BSG protein hydrolysates were more cytotoxic in U937 than in Jurkat T cells (data not shown). Addition of H2O2 to U937 cells decreased SOD activity to 57.2% and increased % tail DNA to approximately 41.8% (P<0.05). Lowest molecular weight (m.w.) hydrolysates (<3,<5 kDa) showed strong protection against SOD reduction (P<0.01), particularly for fractionated hydrolysates of U and W. Only W<5 kDa significantly (P<0.01) repaired H2O2-induced DNA damage. Contrastingly, unfractionated hydrolysates and hydrolysates with higher m.w. (>5 kDa) possessed significant (P<0.05) anti-inflammatory potential, reducing IFN-γ production by up to 22.3%.

In conclusion, this study suggests BSG protein hydrolysates have bioactive potential; with low m.w. and higher m.w. fractionated hydrolysates demonstrating antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, respectively. These hydrolysates represent novel bioactive ingredients for inclusion in functional foods.

Funding for this research was provided under the National Development Plan, through the Food Institutional Research Measure, administered by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland.

References

1. McCarthy, AL, OCallaghan, YC & OBrien, NM (2013) Agriculture 3, 112130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Figure 0

You have Access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Cellular in vitro bioactivity of protein hydrolysates from brewers' spent grain
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Cellular in vitro bioactivity of protein hydrolysates from brewers' spent grain
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Cellular in vitro bioactivity of protein hydrolysates from brewers' spent grain
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *