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The effects of herbage allowance and frequency of allocation, and silage feed value when offered to mid gestation ewes on lamb birth weight and subsequent performance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 November 2017

T.W.J. Keady
Affiliation:
Teagasc, Animal Production Centre, Athenry, Co Galway, Ireland
J.P. Hanrahan
Affiliation:
Teagasc, Animal Production Centre, Athenry, Co Galway, Ireland
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Extract

It is essential to improve efficiency and reduce costs of production with decoupling of subsidy from production post Mid Term Review of the Common Agricultural Policy. Recent studies at this centre (Flanagan 2003, Keady et al., 2006) have shown that extended grazing (grazing during winter), either during mid, late or throughout pregnancy, provides a low cost system of wintering ewes. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of herbage allowance and frequency of allocation, and potential interactions during mid gestation on ewe performance, and lamb birth weight and subsequent performance. Furthermore a direct comparison of herbage allowance and grass silages of differing feed value was also undertaken.

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Theatre Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Science 2007

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References

Flanagan, S. (2003). Indoor and outdoor lambing systems compared. Agricultural Research Forum, p79.Google Scholar
Keady, T.W.J, Hanrahan, J.P. and Flanagan, S. (2006). The effects of flock management during mid and late pregnancy on lamb birthweight and subsequent performance. Agricultural Research Forum, p58.Google Scholar

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