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Staff Procedure Skills in Management Groups during Exercises in Disaster Medicine

  • Anders Rüter (a1), Per Örtenwall (a2) and Tore Vikström

Abstract

Introduction:

In stressful situations such as the management of major incidents and disasters, the ability to work in a structured way is important. Medical management groups initially are formed by personnel from different operations that are on-call when the incident or disaster occurs.

Objective:

The aim of this study was to test if performance indicators for staff procedure skills in medical management groups during simulations could be used as a quality control tool for finding areas that require improvement.

Methods:

A total of 44 management groups were evaluated using performance indicators in which results could be expressed numerically during simulations.

Results:

The lowest scores were given to documentation and to the introduction of new staff members. The highest score was given the utilization of technical equipment.

Conclusions:

Staff procedure skills can be measured during simulations exercises. A logging system may lead to enhancing areas requiring improvement.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Anders Rüter Centre for Teaching and Research in Disaster MedicineUniversity HospitalS-581 85 Linköping, Sweden E-mail: anders.ruter@lio.se

References

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