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Language Institutes and Their Future

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 December 2020

Mildred V. Boyer
Affiliation:
University of Texas Austin 78712

Extract

DURING the summer of 1963, NDEA Title VI supported seventy-nine institutes for teachers of foreign languages. Of this number, it was my pleasure to visit six, in my temporary capacity as one of twenty evaluators cooperating with the MLA, which for the first time was under contract to the Office of Education for evaluating these programs. By now all official reports have been submitted. As an erstwhile evaluator, this writer has no further connection with the Office of Education, and my present relationship to the MLA is merely that of an individual member. Although few of them are original with me, the views expressed here on the over-all future of the institute programs are, therefore, my own. They do not represent those of the Office of Education, nor do they necessarily reflect the MLA's.

Type
Research Article
Information
PMLA , Volume 79 , Issue 4-Part2 , September 1964 , pp. 11 - 17
Copyright
Copyright © 1964 by The Modern Language Association of America

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References

1 In the summer of 1964, two institutes were authorized for teachers of English as a second language (University of Puerto Rico in Río Piedras and University of California at Los Angeles), but the non-English vernacular still goes ignored.

2 While this article was in press, the Language Development Branch, USOE, obtained clearance for a new kind of institute for prospective foreign-language teachers. Three such institutes—one each in French, German, and Spanish for college students at the end of their junior year—are projected for the summer of 1965. We welcome the new departure.

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